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I’ve Just Become A Neo-Conservative; Well, At Least Partially

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One of the foundational concepts of neo-conservativism is American Exceptionalism. Well, I’m an American Exceptionalist, so I’m well on my way to being a neo-conservative. Let me list the ways in which the U.S. is an exceptional country.

.It is the only one to have used atom bombs on a population center. Twice, as it happens.
.It is the only one to have, oh, some 800 military bases in about 130 foreign countries.
.It is the most hypocritical country, in that it popularly thinks the point above constitutes “defense”
.Most people in this nation cannot distinguish “offense” from “defense.” You’ve got to admit it; that’s pretty rare
.It’s military budget is bigger than that of such spending by, oh, the next ten largest nations in this regard
.In 1995, it was the 4th freest country, economically. It has sunk to almost 20th. No other nation can match that.
.It congratulates itself that it is the “home of the free and the brave.” Yet it picks on weak, tiny countries to overrun.

Happy Fourth of July, everyone.

Hey, waitasec. Now that I’m a Neo-Con, well, sort of, can someone please tell me to whom I should apply for generous financial support for my career?

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11:54 am on July 4, 2017

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Our president, the only president of the U.S. at present, my president, your president, everyone’s president (at least in our country) has been under fire from the usual suspects for excessive tweeting. In their view, it is unbecoming of a president of the U.S. to tweet at all, let alone so much. And, also, he hits below the belt: when you get into a mud fight, even if you “win,” you still get dirty. This is the feedback from his so called friends. What is forthcoming from his enemies usually features the four letter “F” word, and it is not “fair” or “free.”

His real supporters have entirely a different view. It is that he is a “fighter” and when he gets hit, he strikes back. And, he usually gives “better” than he receives. This reminds me of comedian Chevy Chase’s continual portrayal of President Gerald Ford as an inept (physical) blunderer, always tripping over his own feet. And yet this target played football at a Big Ten University, and you don’t get to do anything of the sort if you are not a good athlete. I wonder what would have happened had Ford challenged Chase to a sort of decathlon: bowling, shooting free throws, running a quarter mile, swimming 100 yards, a tennis game, etc. I’ll bet Ford, who spotted Chase a decade or two, would have won, and put the latter in his place. Trump’s counter tweeting is seen by his real supporters in this vein.

What is the libertarian take on this matter?

It is pretty positive I claim. One element is that the exalted nature of that office might be taken down a peg or two. Nothing that reduces the prestige of that office can be all bad from the libertarian point of view. Another benefit can best be seen by extrapolation: suppose the Donald did nothing but tweet; would this be good for liberty or not? While Trump has done some good things, or at least bodes well to do so (regulation reduction, tax decreases, his Supreme Court nomination), most of what he has accomplished so far must be placed on the debit side of the ledger: protectionism, and especially bombing countries the U.S. has no business of even occupying in the first place. So, Mr. President, let those tweets rip. The more of them the better. And, while you’re at it, Donald, why not get your cabinet to tweet as well? If you all tweeted, oh, 8-10 hours per day, and left the rest of us strictly alone, that would go on the credit side of the ledger. (Similarly, when Obama went on vacation, or played basketball, liberty got a boost; and, thank God for golf, when Eisenhower was in the oval office).

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2:47 pm on July 3, 2017

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There has been a lot of fuss, in libertarian and conservative circles, about Nancy MacLean’s new book Democracy in Chains. I have not yet read it, but, based on this plethora of reviews it has so far garnered, I discern that one of its main “insights” is that James Buchanan in particular, and his (and Gordon Tullock’s!) Public Choice School in general, are leaders of the libertarian movement; among its very founders. Nothing could be further from the truth, as this book amply demonstrates:

DiLorenzo, Thomas J. and Walter E. Block. 2016. An Austro-Libertarian Critique of Public Choice; Addleton Academic Publishers; www.addletonacademicpublishers.com; 30-18 50th Street, Woodside, New York, 11377; editors@addletonacademicpublishers.com; ISBN 978-1-942585-26-8, eISBN 978-1-942585-27-5

Instead, Tom and I criticize both Buchanan and Public Choice on Austrian and libertarian grounds. Virtually all the chapters were written by my co author and me. I don’t know if Tom agrees with me on this or not, but, I regard the single chapter in that book not written by either of us as the best one in it. It is this, which we reprinted in this book of ours:

Rothbard, Murray. 1997. “Buchanan and Tullock’s ‘The Calculus of Consent,” The Logic of Action II, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, pp. 269-274

I know this is shameless self-promotion, but, if you want a compelling antidote to the view that Buchanan was a leading libertarian, read this book.

As it happens, I am a fan of Democracy in Chains. I have to concede, she does spell the word “libertarian” correctly (at least based on the reviews of it I have seen). She doesn’t spell it “libertoonian,” nor confuse us with librarians nor libertines (none the reviews of it I have seen make this claim). In my view, there is no such thing as bad publicity. Any focus on our beloved philosophy is a good thing. So, thank you, Miss (sic) MacLean.

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12:35 pm on June 30, 2017

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My Upcoming Speeches, Lectures, Debates

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July 16, 2017. Vancouver, BC, Canada. Walter Block debates Tim Moen, Leader of the Canadian Libertarian Party. https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/
436 W Pender Street, downtown Vancouver at 2:30pm. Topic: Is spanking children compatible with libertarianism? Contact: Victor Pross: artpross@hotmail.com; or go here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/1831218550528628/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2229%22%2C%22ref_notif_type%22%3A%22admin_plan_mall_activity%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&notif_t=admin_plan_mall_activity&notif_id=1498028247599964. Open to the public.

July 23-29, 2017. Auburn, AL. Mises University; https://mises.org/events/mises-university-2017

September, 2017. Walter E. Block debates Mike Munger. At Duke University. More information TBA.

On October 5, 2017 I will be delivering the Sebastian J. Raciti Memorial Lecture, named after one of the longest serving business school deans and one of the business school founders at Ramapo College. This lecture will take place at 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, New Jersey. For further information, and to RSVP, contact Prof. Murray Sabrin: msabrin@ramapo.edu (201-684-7373). The title of my lecture: “The Next Business Frontier: Privatizing the Rivers, Oceans and Space.” The event will take place at the Trustees Pavilion at 7pm, which is located across the street from the Anisfield School of Business and about 150 feet away from that building. Open to the public.

October 6-7, 2017. New York City. Mises Institute’s 35th anniversary at the New York Hilton Midtown. https://mises.org/events/35th-anniversary-new-york-city

My Speeches for 2017. Come Join Me If You’re In Town

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3:35 pm on June 28, 2017

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Health Economics Bibliography:

A few days ago, someone asked me for a reading list of material from an Austro-libertarian point of view, on health economics. I placed that on this blog:

Libertarian Views on Health Care

I asked for additions, and several people sent me more material. Thanks to them, I can now offer a greatly expanded bibliography.

Let me just say that this listing is highly relevant, given the attempts of the Republicans to repeal Obamacare. What would a truly free enterprise health care industry look like? This bibliography furnishes some answers to that question. See on this below.

A while ago I sent you an article of me attacking Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz for donating a kidney to an orphan while calling those who traffic organs on the black market “shameful”, and generally being against a free market in organs.
Amazingly, and to my complete and utter surprise, Yanklowitz has just reversed his position.
Here is my original piece attacking him: http://thejewishlibertarian.com/2015/06/22/on-organ-donation-organ-sales-and-hypocrisy/
Here is his original piece attacking organ trafficking: http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/opinion/the-shame-of-orthodoxy-1.281148
Here is his new piece now supporting a (regulated) market in human organs.
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/oct/02/donated-kidneys-paying-black-market-organs

Here is my public apology, which I said I would pen if Yanklowitz ever reversed his position, which he has.

Shmuly Yanklowitz Supports Human Organ Sales!

http://www.oudaily.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2005/12/09/43990bba5cb68

Adams, A. F., A. H. Barnett, and D. L. Kaserman. 1999. Markets of Organs: “The Question of Supply.” Contemporary Economics Policy. 17 (April): 147-155; Anderson, W. L., and A. H. Barnett. 1999. “Waiting for Transplants.” The Free Market 17 (4): 1-2; Barnett, A. H., T. R. Beard, and D. L. Kaserman. 1993. “The Medical Community’s Opposition to Organ Markets: Ethics or Economics?” Review of Industrial Organization. 8: 669-678; Barnett, A. H., R. D. Blair, and D. L. Kaserman. 1992. “Improving Organ Donations: Compensation Versus Markets.” Inquiry. 29 (Fall): 372-378; Barnett, A. H., and D. L. Kaserman. 1995. “The ‘Rush to Transplant’ and Organ Shortages.” Economic Inquiry. 33 (July): 506-515; Barnett, W. II, 1988. “The Market in Used Human Body Parts.” The Free Market. 6 (11): 5; Barnett, W. II, M. Saliba, and D. Walker. 2001. “ A Free Market in Kidneys: Efficient and Equitable.” The Independent Review. 5 (3): 373-385; Barney Jr., D., and L. Reynolds. 1989. “An Economic analysis of Transplant Organs.” Atlantic Economic Journal. 17 (September): 12-20; Blair, R. D., and D. L. Kaserman. 1991. “The Economics and Ethics of Alternative Cadaveric Organ Procurement Policies.” Yale Journal on Regulation. 8: 403-452; Block, Walter E. 1988. The Case for a Free Market in Body Parts. The Free Market 6 (3): 3; Block, Walter E., Roy Whitehead, Clint Johnson, Mana Davidson, Alan White and Stacy Chandler, “Human Organ Transplantation: Economic and Legal Issues,” Quinnipiac College School of Law Health Journal, Vol. 3, 1999-2000, pp. 87-110; Caplan, A. L. 1992. If I Were a Rich Man Could I Buy a Pancreas? And Other Essays on the Ethics of Health Care. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press; Carlstrom, C. T., and C. D. Rollow. 1997. “The Rationing of Transplantable Organs: A Troubled Lineup.” Cato Journal. 17 (Fall): 163-177; DeJong, W., J. Drachman,, S. L. Gortmaker, et al. 1995. “Options for Increasing Organ Donations: The Potential Role for Financial Incentives, Standardized Hospital Procedures, and Public Education to Promote Family Discussion.” The Milbank Quarterly 73 (3): 463-479; Hansmann, H. 1989. “The Economics and Ethics of Markets for Human Organs.” Journal of Health, Politics, and Policy and Law. (Spring): 57-85; Kaserman, D. L., and A. H. Barnett. 1991. “An Economic Analysis of Transplant Organs: A Comment and Extension.” Atlantic Economic Journal. 19 (June): 57-63; Prince, Dennis. 1999. “Organ for Sale—Not Wurlitzer.” http://www.auctionwatch.com/awdaily/dailynews/1-090399.html; Richards, J. R. 1996. “Nephrarious Goings On: Kidney Sales and Moral Arguments.” The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. 21 (4) August: 375-416; Rottenberg, S. 1971. “The Production and Exchange of Used Body Parts.” Towards Liberty. 2: 322-333; Schwindt, R., and A. R. Vining. 1986. “Proposal for a Future Delivery Market for Transplant Organs.” Journal of Health Policy and Law. 11 (Fall): 483-500; Vining, A. R., and R. Schwindt. 1988. “Have a Heart: Increasing the Supply of Transplant Organs for Infants and Children.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. 7 (4) 706-710; Williams, Walter. 2013. “Unnecessarty Tragedy.” June 11; http://www.lewrockwell.com/williams-w/w-williams172.html

Transplant:: Body parts:: organs:: transplants:

Anderson, W. L., & Barnett, A. (April 1999). Waiting for Transplants The Free Market, 17(4). Retrieved from http://mises.org/freemarket_detail.aspx?control=29

Barnett, A. (Monday, February 15, 1999). Die Waiting. Mises Daily. Retrieved from http://mises.org/daily/146

Barnett, W. I., Saliba, M., & Walker, D. (Winter 2001). A Free Market in Kidneys: Efficient and Equitable. The Independent Review, V(3), 373–385. Retrieved from http://www.independent.org/pdf/tir/tir_05_3_barnett.pdf

Barnett, William. 1988. The Market for Used Human Body Parts, The Free Market, Vol. 6, No. 2; http://mises.org/daily/4231.

Barnett, William II, and Michael Saliba. 2004. “A Free Market for Kidneys: Options, Futures, Forward, and Spot.” Managerial Finance. 30 (5): 38-56.

Beard, T. R., Jackson, J. D., & Kaserman, D. L. (Winter 2007-2008 ). The Failure of U.S. Organ Procurement Policy Regulation, 30(4). Retrieved from http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1092920

Block, Walter E., Roy Whitehead, Clint Johnson, Mana Davidson, Alan White and Stacy Chandler. 1999-2000. “Human Organ Transplantation: Economic and Legal Issues,” Quinnipiac College School of Law Health Journal, Vol. 3, pp. 87-110; http://141.164.133.3/faculty/Block/Articles%20for%20web/Human%20Oragn… <http://141.164.133.3/faculty/Block/Articles%20for%20web/Human%20Oragn… ; http://www.walterblock.com/publications/human_organ_transplantation.pdf

Block, Walter. 1987. “A Free Market in Kidneys?” The Freeman Ideas on Liberty, August, p. 308; http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1802 <http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1802 ; 8/25, Bensalem News.

Block, Walter. 1988. “Caveat Emptor,” The Freeman Ideas on Liberty, May, pp. 180-181, http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1903.

Block, Walter. 1988. “The Case for a Free Market in Body Parts,” Essays in the Economics of Liberty: The Free Market Reader, Llewellyn Rockwell, ed., California: The Ludwig von Mises Institute, pp. 65-70, 195-199, 266-272. http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=476 http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=476

Block, Walter. June 2004. “Contracts.” Encyclopedia of Capitalism. New York: Facts On File, pp. 172-174

Carey, D. (Thursday, February 21, 2002 ). Let the Market Save Lives. Mises Daily. Retrieved from http://mises.org/daily/898

Cherry, Mark J., ed. 1999. Persons and Their Bodies: Rights, Responsibilities, and the Sale of Organs. Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Clay, Megan and Walter E. Block. 2002. “A Free Market for Human Organs,” The Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2, Summer, pp. 227-236;

Farber, Rafi. 2015. “On organ donation, Organ Sales, and Hypocrisy.” June 22;
On Organ Donation, Organ Sales, and Hypocrisy

Garner, Richard and Walter E. Block. 2008. “Harvesting organs on the final frontier: a critique of Star Trek.” Issue 2; pp. 65-xx. Ethics and Critical Thinking Journal; http://www.franklinpublishing.net/ethicscriticalthinking.html
http://www.walterblock.com/publications/market_human_organs.pdf <http://www.walterblock.com/publications/market_human_organs.pdf ; http://www.jspes.org/summer2002_clay.html

Healy, Kieran. 2006. Last Best Gifts: Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and Organs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Hippen, Benjamin E. 2008. “Organ Sales and Moral Travails: Lessons from the Living Kidney Vendor Program in Iran” Cato Policy Analysis, 614; http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=9273

Kaserman, D. L. Markets for Organs: Myths and Misconceptions. Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy, 18. Retrieved from http://ssrn.com/paper=327260

Kaserman, D. L., & Barnett, A. H. (2002). The U.S. Organ Procurement System: A Prescription for Reform (Evaluative Studies.). Washington D.C.: AEI Press.

Malek, N. P. (Friday, April 20, 2001). Sell Your Kidney, Make a Profit. Mises Daily. Retrieved from http://mises.org/daily/660

Richards, Janet Radcliffe. 2001. “Organs for sale.” Indian Journal of Medical Ethics. Vol. 9, No. 2, April-June; http://www.issuesinmedicalethics.org/092di047.html

Taylor, James Stacey. 2005. Stakes and Kidneys Why Markets in Human Body Parts are Morally Imperative Ashgate Publishing

Taylor, James Stacey. 2006. Why the ‘Black Market’ Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail. Res Publica 12 (2).

Taylor, James Stacey. 2007. A “Queen of Hearts” Trial of Organ Markets: Why Scheper-Hughes’s Objections to Markets in Human Organs Fail. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):201-204.

Young, A. (January 07, 2004). Organ Donations: Socialism or Laissez-Faire? Mises Daily. Retrieved from http://mises.org/daily/1414

Wilkinson, Stephen. 2003. Bodies for sale: ethics and exploitation in the human body trade. New York: Routledge

Williams, Walter. 2013. “Unnecessarty Tragedy.” June 11; http://www.lewrockwell.com/williams-w/w-williams172.html

*
Transplant:: Body parts:: organs:: transplants:: organ:: donation::

Anderson, 2003; Anderson and Barnett,1999; Barnett, A., 1999; Barnett, W. 1988; Barnett, Saliba, & Walker, 2001; Barnett and Saliba, 2004; Beard, Jackson & Kaserman, 2007-2008; Block, Whitehead, Johnson, Davidson, White and Chandler. 1999-2000; Block, 1987, 1988A,1988B; Carey, 2002; Cherry, 1999; Clay and Block. 2002; Farber, 2015A, 2015B; Garner and Block. 2008; Healy, 2006; Hippen, 2008; Kaserman, 2002; Kaserman & Barnett, 2002; Malek, 2001; Richards, 2001; Taylor, 2005, 2006, 2007; Wilkinson, 2003; Young, 2004

Anderson, William L. 2003. “Communitarianism and Commodification,” February 27;
http://mises.org/story/1174

Anderson, W. L., & Barnett, A. 1999. “Waiting for Transplants.” The Free Market, 17(4). http://mises.org/freemarket_detail.aspx?control=29

Barnett, Andy. 1999. “Die Waiting.” Mises Daily. http://mises.org/daily/146

Barnett, William II., Michael Saliba, & Deborah Walker. 2001. “A Free Market in Kidneys: Efficient and Equitable.” The Independent Review, V(3), 373–385; http://www.independent.org/pdf/tir/tir_05_3_barnett.pdf

Barnett, William. 1988. The Market for Used Human Body Parts, The Free Market, Vol. 6, No. 2; http://mises.org/daily/4231.

Barnett, William II, and Michael Saliba. 2004. “A Free Market for Kidneys: Options, Futures, Forward, and Spot.” Managerial Finance. 30 (5): 38-56.

Barnett, William. 1988. The Market for Used Human Body Parts, The Free Market, Vol. 6, No. 2; http://mises.org/daily/4231.

Barnett, William II, and Michael Saliba. 2004. “A Free Market for Kidneys: Options, Futures, Forward, and Spot.” Managerial Finance. 30 (5): 38-56.

Beard, T. R., Jackson, J. D., & Kaserman, D. L. 2007-2008. “The Failure of U.S. Organ Procurement Policy.” Regulation, 30(4); http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1092920

Block, Walter E., Roy Whitehead, Clint Johnson, Mana Davidson, Alan White and Stacy Chandler. 1999-2000. “Human Organ Transplantation: Economic and Legal Issues,” Quinnipiac College School of Law Health Journal, Vol. 3, pp. 87-110; http://141.164.133.3/faculty/Block/Articles%20for%20web/Human%20Oragn; http://www.walterblock.com/publications/human_organ_transplantation.pdf

Block, Walter E. 1987. “A Free Market in Kidneys?” The Freeman Ideas on Liberty, August, p. 308; http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1802 <http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1802 ;

Block, Walter. 1988A. “Caveat Emptor,” The Freeman Ideas on Liberty, May, pp. 180-181, http://www.fee.org/vnews.php?nid=1903.

Block, Walter. 1988B. “The Case for a Free Market in Body Parts,” Essays in the Economics of Liberty: The Free Market Reader, Llewellyn Rockwell, ed., California: The Ludwig von Mises Institute, pp. 65-70, 195-199, 266-272; http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=476

Carey, D. 2002 . “Let the Market Save Lives.” Mises Daily. February 21; http://mises.org/daily/898

Cherry, Mark J., ed. 1999. Persons and Their Bodies: Rights, Responsibilities, and the Sale of Organs. Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Clay, Megan and Walter E. Block. 2002. “A Free Market for Human Organs,” The Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2, Summer, pp. 227-236;
http://www.walterblock.com/publications/market_human_organs.pdf;
http://www.jspes.org/summer2002_clay.html

Farber, Rafi. 2015A. “On organ donation, Organ Sales, and Hypocrisy.” June 22;
On Organ Donation, Organ Sales, and Hypocrisy

Farber, Rafi. 2015B. “Shock and Awe! Rabbi Shmuly Supports Human Organ Sales .” October 5; http://www.targetliberty.com/2015/10/shock-and-awe-rabbi-shmuly-supports.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TargetLiberty+%28Target+Liberty%29

Garner, Richard and Walter E. Block. 2008. “Harvesting organs on the final frontier: a critique of Star Trek.” Issue 2; pp. 65-75. Ethics and Critical Thinking Journal; http://www.franklinpublishing.net/ethicscriticalthinking.html
http://www.walterblock.com/publications/market_human_organs.pdf

Healy, Kieran. 2006. Last Best Gifts: Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and Organs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Hippen, Benjamin E. 2008. “Organ Sales and Moral Travails: Lessons from the Living Kidney Vendor Program in Iran.” Cato Policy Analysis, 614; http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=9273

Kaserman, D. L. 2002. “Markets for Organs: Myths and Misconceptions.” Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy, 18; http://ssrn.com/paper=327260

Kaserman, D. L., & Barnett, A. H. 2002. The U.S. Organ Procurement System: A Prescription for Reform (Evaluative Studies). Washington D.C.: AEI Press.

Malek, N. P. 2001. Sell Your Kidney, Make a Profit. Mises Daily. April 20, http://mises.org/daily/660

Richards, Janet Radcliffe. 2001. “Organs for sale.” Indian Journal of Medical Ethics. Vol. 9, No. 2, April-June; http://www.issuesinmedicalethics.org/092di047.html

Taylor, James Stacey. 2005. Stakes and Kidneys Why Markets in Human Body Parts are Morally Imperative. Ashgate Publishing

Taylor, James Stacey. 2006. “Why the ‘Black Market’ Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail.” Res Publica 12 (2).

Taylor. James Stacey. 2007. “A ‘Queen of Hearts’ Trial of Organ Markets: Why Scheper-Hughes’s Objections to Markets in Human Organs Fail.” Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):201-204.

Young, Adam. 2004. “Organ Donations: Socialism or Laissez-Faire?” Mises Daily. January 07; http://mises.org/daily/1414

Wilkinson, Stephen. 2003. Bodies for sale: ethics and exploitation in the human body trade. New York: Routledge

Con:

Etzoini, Undated; Scheper-Hughes, 2002, 2005; Sullivan, 1983;

Etzioni, Amitai. Undated. “Organ Donation: A Communitarian Approach.”
https://www.gwu.edu/~ccps/Organ_Donation.pdf

Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 2002. “The Ends of the Body–Commodity Fetishism and the Global Traffic in Organs” SAIS Review 22(1):61-80, January; https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236821086_The_Ends_of_the_Body–Commodity_Fetishism_and_the_Global_Traffic_in_Organs

Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 2005. “The Ultimate Commodity.” The Lancet.
Volume 366, No. 9494, pp. 1349–1350, 15 October
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)67550-2/abstract

Sullivan, Walter. 1983. “Buying of kidneys of poor attacked.” September 24;
http://www.nytimes.com/1983/09/24/us/buying-of-kidneys-of-poor-attacked.html

2. Health:: Socialized medicine:: health care:

Block, 2003; Friedman, 1962; Goodman and Musgrave, 1992; Gratzer, 2005; Hamowy, 1984; Herbener, 1996; Holly, 2013; Hoppe, 1993; Johnson, et.al., 1998; Laydon and Block, 1996; McGuff and Murphy, 2015; Porter, 2006; Terrell, 2003.

Block, Walter. 2003. “Socialized Medicine is the Problem,” Surgical Neurology, Vol. 60, No. 5, November, pp. 467-46

Friedman, Milton. 1962. Capitalism and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, chapter 9

Goodman, John C. and Gerald L. Musgrave, 1992. Patient Power: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis. Washington D.C.: Cato

Gratzer, David. 2005. “The Return of HillaryCare: Socialized medicine is still not a good idea. The Weekly Standard. May 23; http://www.medicalprogresstoday.com/spotlight/spotlight_indarchive.php?id=778

Hamowy, Ronald. 1984. Canadian Medicine: A Study in Restricted Entry, Vancouver: The Fraser Institute

Herbener, Jeffrey. 1996. “Socialized Medicine, Take Two.” The Free Market. Vol. 14, No. 7, July. http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=172&sortorder=articledate

Holly, Mike.2013. “How Government Regulations Made Healthcare So Expensive.” December 17;
http://bastiat.mises.org/2013/12/how-government-regulations-made-healthcare-so-expensive/

Hoppe, Hans-Hermann. 1993. “A Four-Step Health-Care Solution.” The Free Market. Vol. 11, No. 4, April; http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=279

Johnson, Clint, Walter E. Block and Thomas Oxner. 1998. “Notes on Health Care Financing and Free Markets,” Journal of Accounting, Ethics and Public Policy, Vol. 1, No. 3, Summer 1998, pp. 488-502.

Layden, William R. and Walter E. Block. 1996. “Health Security,” Nomos, July, No. 47/48, pp. 38-45

McGuff, Doug and Robert P. Murphy. 2015. The Primal Prescription: Surviving the “Sick Care” Sinkhole; http://store.mises.org/Primal-Prescription-Surviving-The-Sick-Care-Sinkhole-P11014.aspx

Porter, Michael 2006. Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results: Harvard Business Review Press. https://www.amazon.com/dp/1591397782/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_dp_T2_GoRuzbVZG2TDD

Terrell, Timothy D. 2003. “Socialized Medicine in America.” The Free Market. Vol. 23, No. 11, November; http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=458&sortorder=articledate

Socialized medicine: queues:

Barua, et. al., 2010; DiLorenzo, 2009; Esmail, 2009A, 2009B, 2011; Globerman and Hoye, 1990; Hazel and Esmail, 2008; Sanmartin et al., 2004;

Barua, Bacchus, Mark Rovere, and Brett J. Skinner. 2010. Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada (20th ed.). Fraser Institute.

DiLorenzo, Thomas J. 2009. “Socialized Healthcare vs. The Laws Of Economics,” Mises Daily, no. 3586; July 28; http://mises.org/daily/3586

Esmail, Nadeem. 2009A. Waiting Your Turn: Hospital Waiting Lists in Canada (19th ed.). Fraser Institute

Esmail, Nadeem. 2009B. The Private Cost Of Public Queues, 2009. Fraser Forum (November):32-36.

Esmail, Nadeem. 2011. “The private cost of public queues.” Fraser Forum, March/April, pp. 22-27; http://www.fraserinstitute.org/uploadedFiles/fraser-ca/Content/research-news/research/articles/private-cost-of-public-queues-march2011.pdf

Globerman, Steven, with Lorna Hoye. 1990. Waiting Your Turn: Hospital Waiting Lists in Canada. Fraser Institute.

Hazel, Maureen and Nadeem Esmail. 2008. The Private Cost of Public Queues. Fraser Forum (December/January):25–29.

Sanmartin, Claudia, François Gendron, Jean-Marie Berthelot, and Kellie Murphy. 2004. Access to Health Care Services in Canada, 2003. Catalogue No. 82-575-XIE.

H.T. Engelhardt, Jr., and Kevin W. Wildes, S.J., “The Four Principles of Health Care and Post-Modernity: Why a Libertarian Interpretation is Unavoidable,” Principles of Health Care Ethics, ed. Raanan Gillon (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1994), pp. 135-147.

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10:52 pm on June 27, 2017

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My Recent Hour Long Interview With A Canadian Libertarian

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June 26, 2017. Kyle McCormack [mailto:kymcengineer@gmail.com] The morality (or lack there of) of government, as a First Principle of Libertarianism. Is a nation-state required to establish a culture of freedom and tolerance? Why or why not? Free-market environmentalism – how will libertarians protect nature? The “Big” Topic: Libertarian Borders – Open, Closed, Something Else? (Privatize Everything, right?) Explain real anarchy to the audience – why should we privatize everything? Ending on: what is the BEST way to begin the process of waking up a left-leaning big-government individual to the concepts and truths of Liberty?

https://www.patreon.com/posts/episode-014-june-12188293

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4:22 pm on June 27, 2017

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From: P
Sent: Sun 6/18/2017 9:34 AM
To: Walter Block
Subject: Laura Loomer free speech? Q for WB
Hi Professor B – Journalist Laura Loomer interrupted the Shakespeare in the Park play of Julius Caesar. Now, correct me if I’m wrong but let’s begin by asking about a play on my own property, funded with my own money. In that situation I can hold a play about anything, including acting out the murder of any person, multiple person, sex acts, whatever I want, no? If the play is ‘artistic’ or not is irrelevant. On unequivocal private property with my own funds I can perform what I want. I understand it gets tricky when the company that performs the play uses public property, and may be subsidized by the government in other direct monetary terms ( I don’t know exactly how the theater company exactly works with the government but at the very least they are subsidized by being able to have temporary rights on Central Park public property). So, my question is this. In the former situation we can agree that Laura Loomer would be a trespasser violating the NAP. But, does she have any way she can legitimate her actions for what she did in Central Park? Thanks, P

I don’t think libertarians have a fully worked out theory as to who has the right to use public property, when there are contending forces pulling in different directions. One possibility is that such a theory would give the nod to the more libertarian of the competitors. Thus, the Nazis should not have been allowed to March in Skokie, IL, since they were the least libertarian of the two contenders (them versus the mainly Jewish protesters). I’m not sure who is more libertarian when it comes to the Trump vis a vis the anti Trump forces. Probably, I’d give the nod to the former, but it would be a very close thing, given that Trump is now violating his non intervention foreign policy promises, the main reason that drew me to him in the first place. Therefore, according to this theory, we libertarians should come down on the side of Laurie Loomer.

However, there is a different theory more compatible with basic libertarian principles of homesteading and private property rights: whoever’s tax money went into the production of the public property in question should be given the nod. That is, all public properties should be awarded to the people who paid for them through taxation. This is very difficult to determine, of course, without a God’s eye point of view, which we of course lack. Another possibility is to give the farms to the farmers, the factories to the workers, the schools to the teachers, etc. Namely, utilize homesteading one of our core principles. Here, possession is 9/10ths of the law, and Loomer was wrong, since the stage would then belong to the actors and actresses (the overwhelming majority of whom are socialists).

From an aesthetic point of view, however, her behavior is very welcome. All too often our friends on the left disrupt the activities of our friends on the right. It is time that the so-called liberals, the so-called progressives, got a little taste of their own medicine.

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2:52 pm on June 27, 2017

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C’mon Down To New Orleans; The Water’s Fine. Enroll at Loyola University

If you are an adult past school age, please send this to young people on whose behalf you want to promote free enterprise: Are you a student? What school? What major? What year? I ask because I am an economics professor at Loyola University New Orleans, and I am looking for students to come study with me. Loyola must be one of the very few universities in the entire world where all the professors in the economics department are heavily oriented towards Austrian (free market) economics and libertarianism. An incomparable advantage of our program is that we ensure students are taught ALL schools of economic thought (including Keynesianism and neo-classical economics) and political philosophy (including socialism and communism). Unlike many other economics departments, however, we critique the various schools of thought and through this process provide students with all sides of these issues. We are constantly on the lookout for bright students who would benefit from studying with professors who appreciate economic freedom, free markets, private property rights and laissez faire capitalism. If you are a high school or college student, please get in touch with me so that I can urge you to consider applying or transferring to Loyola New Orleans. If you are past school age but know any young persons who would be interested our program, please pass this note on to them.

Why attend Loyola, and not a more prestigious place like Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Chicago, Stanford? The difference is we focus on undergraduate students, placing emphasis on individual attention, no teaching assistants here! Second, if you want to go on for advanced study, get a Ph.D., prestige matters for your graduate school, not so much for your undergraduate education. Third, if you want to learn the case in favor of Austrian economics, free enterprise, laissez faire capitalism, you’ll need the scope and depth our faculty can provide you, you’ll find what you want at Loyola. Why the emphasis on Austrian economics? Read this on that: Rockwell, Llewellyn H., Jr. 1995. Why Austrian Economics Matters. Auburn AL: The Mises Institute; http://www.mises.org/etexts/why_ae.asp

Open letter to college aged students interested in Austrian economics (the economics of Ron Paul, Friedrich Hayek, Murray Rothbard and Ludwig von Mises) and libertarianism (the political philosophy of Ron Paul, Ayn Rand, Robert Nozick and Murray Rothbard).

Please consider enrolling at Loyola University New Orleans. I’d LOVE to have you as a student. If you are interested and would like to know more about applying or transferring, CONTACT ME NOW!! Wblock@loyno.edu

If you are seriously interested, I will connect you directly to our admissions office where they will assist you with admission, transfer options and scholarships.

I think it would be a big mistake for any student who appreciates Austrian economics and the libertarian political philosophy to go to any college or university without at least a few Austro-libertarian professors. All of my colleagues in our four member economics department are very free market oriented. Two others of them, apart from me, are also Austrian economists (Bill Barnett, and Leo Krasnozhon). The one non-Austrian in the department (John Levendis) is very sympathetic to this school of thought. There are also two solid libertarian professors in our law school (Jim Viator, David Gruning). Nick Capaldi, another libertarian, teaches business ethics. We even have a professor of chemistry, Bill Walkenhorst, who is supportive of our free enterprise initiatives, and attends many of our events. It is also possible to earn a BA in economics, which, instead of business courses, you take courses in humanities and social sciences.

An added benefit of enrolling at Loyola is that we encourage students to publish in refereed scholarly journals and regularly succeed in so placing their writings. This is the “publish or perish” syndrome that determines promotion and tenure for professors – so being published in venues of this sort is an unusual honor for undergraduates. For a listing of past successes in this regard please get in touch with me.

Our economics club which meets twice a month, has had such outside speakers as Ron Paul, Hans Hoppe, Guido Hulsmann, Tom DiLorenzo, Bob Higgs, Walter Williams, Roger Garrison, Tom Woods, Peter Boettke, Tibor Machan, James Buchanan, George Ayittey, Richard Ebeling, Judge Andrew Napolitano and Joe Salerno. Ron Paul spoke for our economics club in the fall, 2009 to a gigantic audience. Our libertarian seminar studies books like Rothbard’s For a New Liberty and the Ethics of Liberty. Our Austrian economic seminar discusses publications such as Mises’ Human Action, and, most recently, Murray Rothbard’s The Case Against the Fed, and Tom Wood’s, Meltdown. These seminars are so popular with libertarian students at other New Orleans area Universities (Tulane, UNO) that not only do they attend them, they actually enroll in our courses (economics as taught at these other universities is very mainstream; that is, Keynesian and mathematically oriented.)

With all of this Austro-libertarian activity, and free market professors, as you can imagine, many of our students have adopted this philosophy. C’mon down. You’ll be among friends. At pretty much at any other college, with one or two exceptions, you’d be an ugly duckling. With us, you’ll be a beautiful swan. This doesn’t mean we don’t have socialist, liberal, “progressive” and multi-culturist professors. Like most universities, we have plenty of them and they vastly outnumber us; but this is not altogether bad: it is good to acquaint yourself with all perspectives in political economy. However, Loyola is virtually unique in also presenting students with a strong free libertarian Austrian enterprise point of view.

WE DO OFFER SCHOLARSHIPS. The Office of Admissions offers several types of academic scholarships based on need and merit. My suggestion is to apply to Loyola http://apply.loyno.edu/ to determine your eligibility. The College of Business does offer some scholarships on a one-time basis based on need and academics, but are reserved for current students, not new admits. Please let me know if you have any questions about this. The website offers quite a bit of useful information, specifically on the scholarships and financial aid webpage http://www.loyno.edu/financialaid/

If you are interested in becoming a professor of economics, consider this: several of my former students are now doing just that: Andy Young, Texas Tech; Ed Stringham, Trinity College; Billy Kosteas, Cleveland State University; Dan D’Amico, Brown University; Jenny Dirmeyer, Ferris State University; Emily Shaefer Skarbeck, King’s College, London; Nick Snow, Wabash College.

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1:41 pm on June 27, 2017

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From: B
Sent: Mon 6/26/2017 1:33 PM
To: Walter Block
Subject: Re: re. a question

I’d like to get a handle on the issue of health care, focusing on both our current system and a possible free-market replacement. Under this broad heading, I’d like to better understand our current (guild) medical system, our so-called insurance system, and the roles played by government. I’d be thankful for any reading suggestions you might have. B

Dear B: See below.

Dear Everyone Else:

If you have suggestions for additions to my list, please send them to me. I’d like to compile a more complete reading list on socialized medicine, and its very opposite, the free enterprise position.

Block, 2003; Friedman, 1962; Goodman and Musgrave, 1992; Gratzer, 2005; Hamowy, 1984; Herbener, 1996; Holly, 2013; Hoppe, 1993; Johnson, et.al., 1998; Laydon and Block, 1996; Salerno, 2016; Terrell, 2003.

Block, Walter. 2003. “Socialized Medicine is the Problem,” Surgical Neurology, Vol. 60, No. 5, November, pp. 467-46

Friedman, Milton. 1962. Capitalism and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, chapter 9

Goodman, John C. and Gerald L. Musgrave, 1992. Patient Power: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis. Washington D.C.: Cato

Gratzer, David. 2005. “The Return of HillaryCare: Socialized medicine is still not a good idea. The Weekly Standard. May 23; http://www.medicalprogresstoday.com/spotlight/spotlight_indarchive.php?id=778

Hamowy, Ronald. 1984. Canadian Medicine: A Study in Restricted Entry, Vancouver: The Fraser Institute

Herbener, Jeffrey. 1996. “Socialized Medicine, Take Two.” The Free Market. Vol. 14, No. 7, July. http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=172&sortorder=articledate

Holly, Mike.2013. “How Government Regulations Made Healthcare So Expensive.” December 17;
http://bastiat.mises.org/2013/12/how-government-regulations-made-healthcare-so-expensive/

Hoppe, Hans-Hermann. 1993. “A Four-Step Health-Care Solution.” The Free Market. Vol. 11, No. 4, April; http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=279

Johnson, Clint, Walter E. Block and Thomas Oxner. 1998. “Notes on Health Care Financing and Free Markets,” Journal of Accounting, Ethics and Public Policy, Vol. 1, No. 3, Summer 1998, pp. 488-502.

Layden, William R. and Walter E. Block. 1996. “Health Security,” Nomos, July, No. 47/48, pp. 38-45

Salerno, Joseph P. 2016. “Laura Hillier, RIP.” February 11;
https://mises.org/blog/laura-hillier-rip

Terrell, Timothy D. 2003. “Socialized Medicine in America.” The Free Market. Vol. 23, No. 11, November; http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=458&sortorder=articledate

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1:57 pm on June 26, 2017

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Libertarianism: The Third Way

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I just got an over the transom message from the US Constitution Project, an organization sponsoring a debate between constitionalists and progressives.

Here is my response to them: I’m a fan of political debates, so I support your efforts. However, in my view, there are not only two viewpoints, left and right, or progressives (liberals) and conservatives (constitutionalists). There is also a third view, equidistant from both: libertarianism. Why not include us, too?

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1:30 pm on June 26, 2017

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