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This correspondence refers to something that appeared in this book:

DiLorenzo, Thomas J. and Walter E. Block. 2017. An Austro-Libertarian Critique of Public Choice; Addleton Academic Publishers; www.addletonacademicpublishers.com

From: jonnyl21

Sent: Friday, March 11, 2022 6:17 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Buchanan vs Rothbard vs Lingenfelter on Professional Thieves

Walter,

I was reading the Introduction to your An Austro-Libertarian Critique of Public Choice, and I saw that you included a short paper by Rothbard responding to The Calculus of Consent. The Rothbard paper included the following quote on professional thieves:

“Why all of us are supposed to be behind the constitutional decisions, Buchanan and Tullock do not really support. They say (as Buchanan did in his journal article last year) that a thief is really for a law against stealing so as to keep his own property, so that it can be said that even a thief in a way approves of his own punishment. I think this is absurd; a professional thief is clearly opposed to laws against stealing (it is a rule of honor among professional criminals not to run to the police for help — and also a wise precaution for them). How did Buchanan and Tullock manage to get into this trap? By blithely assuming that when the “constitution” is being considered, no one knows whether or not he will be able to benefit by the various rules in specific situations, so it is to everyone’s self-interest to have rules, as it were, in the general interest. Now this appears to me to be completely insupportable; people do have certain interests, and they will be able to gauge to what extent a rule will benefit or not benefit them. (This is especially true because Buchanan and Tullock think of the “constitution” as continuing, rather than as the original writing.) The professional thief knows he is a professional thief, and therefore that the weakening of laws against stealing, or constitutional provisions against stealing, will benefit him, and so on.”

Buchanan says that professional thieves really support laws against theft because thieves value their own property. Rothbard says that professional thieves do not support laws against theft because those laws might imprison thieves. I say both are wrong; professional thieves support laws against theft because those laws might imprison thieves.

Professional thieves are the ones who effectively compete in the pseudo-market of theft. If anti-theft laws were to weaken, currently submarginal thieves would enter the field. This would reduce the returns to current entrants. This analysis is similar to that of rum runners supporting Prohibition. They could not compete as well against legal producers.

I just accused Rothbard of error. That is heresy in a cult like ours! What say you?

Your grateful student, Jonathan

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Friday, March 11, 2022 10:24 AM

To: ‘jonnyl21’

Subject: RE: Buchanan vs Rothbard vs Lingenfelter on Professional Thieves

Dear Jonathan:

You make a reasonable point. If laws against stealing, marginal thieves would enter the “market,” reducing the returns for expert robbers. But expert crooks would also benefit, since they would be caught less often. I think then that this is an empirical issue, and I’m not sure which effect is stronger.

Why do you call the followers of Rothbard cultish? In a cult, no one may criticize the cult leader. Yet, I’m a long time member of this non cult, and I’ve often criticized my friend and mentor, Murray Rothbard:

Critiques of Rothbard by Walter E. Block

Block, Walter E. and Alan Futerman. 2021.  The Classical Liberal Case for Israel. With commentary by Benjamin Netanyahu. Springer Publishing Company;

https://rd.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-16-3953-1;

ISBN_978-981-16-3952-4 [Print]; 978-981-16-3953-1 [ebook]

for book reviewers: https://www.springer.com/gp/reviewers

To purchase: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-16-3953-1

https://books.google.com.ar/books?id=vyBMEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=es&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false;

https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Walter-Block/dp/9811639523/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_US=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&keywords=The+Classical+Liberal+Case+for+Israel&qid=1637966038&qsid=134-3849508-4542041&s=books&sr=1-1&sres=B09KX5BVMT&srpt=ABIS_BOOK;

https://www.springer.com/gp/instructors/textbook-copy-request-us/17556774;

Offers a unique perspective on the State of Israel based on classical liberalism and libertarianism. Provides a thorough understanding of Israel’s origin and development. Explores different topics on Israel, including Anti-Zionism and Israel’s economic development.

Barnett II, William and Walter E. Block. 2012. “The Optimum Quantity of Money, Once Again.” Economics, Management, and Financial Markets; Vol. 7, No. 1, March, pp. 9-24; http://www.addletonacademicpublishers.com/component/option,com_sectionex/Itemid,103/id,23/view,category/#catid145; Password: AddletonAP2009. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-Optimum-Quantity-of-Money%2C-Once-Again-Barnett-Block/2d43f6dbc3bebfcd9790ed67a35b2fd211374779

Block, Walter E. 2011A. “Hoppe, Kinsella and Rothbard II on Immigration: A Critique.” Journal of Libertarian Studies; Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 593–623; http://mises.org/journals/jls/22_1/22_1_29.pdf

Block, Walter E. 2011B. “Rejoinder to Hoppe on Immigration,” Journal of Libertarian Studies Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 771–792; http://mises.org/journals/jls/22_1/22_1_38.pdf

Barnett, William II, and Walter E. Block. 2009. “Investment and Consumption: A critique of Rothbard’s claim that there can be no such thing as governmental ‘investment’” Journal of Public Finance and Public Choice. 27 (2-3): 183-188; http://www.walterblock.com/wp-content/uploads/InvestmentConsumption.pdf

Barnett, William II and Walter E. Block. 2007. “Saving and Investment: A Praxeological Approach.” New Perspectives on Political Economy, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 129 – 138;

http://pcpe.libinst.cz/nppe/3_2/nppe3_2_1.pdfhttp://141.164.133.3/exchange/walterblock/Inbox/Re%20query.EML/nppe3_2_block.pdf/C58EA28C-18C0-4a97-9AF2-036E93DDAFB3/nppe3_2_block.pdf?attach=1http://www.academia.edu/1359832/Saving_and_Investment_A_Praxeological_Approach

Block, Walter E., Peter Klein and Per Henrik Hansen. 2007. “The Division of Labor under Homogeneity: A Critique of Mises and Rothbard” The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, April Vol. 66 Issue 2, pp. 457-464; http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/ajes/66/2http://141.164.133.3/exchange/walterblock/Inbox/Re:%20link_x003F_-2.EML/1_multipart_xF8FF_2_j.1536-7150.2007.00520.pdf/C58EA28C-18C0-4a97-9AF2-036E93DDAFB3/j.1536-7150.2007.00520.pdf?attach=1

Block, Walter E., William Barnett II and Joseph Salerno. 2006. “Relationship between wealth or income and time preference is empirical, not apodictic: critique of Rothbard and Hoppe,” Review of Austrian Economics, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 69-80; http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11138-006-6094-8

Barnett, William II, and Walter E. Block. 2005-2006. “Mises, Rothbard and Salerno on Costs.” Corporate Ownership & Control, Winter, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 204-206

Barnett, William II, and Walter E. Block.  2005. “Money: Capital Good, Consumers’ Good, or (Media of) Exchange Good?” Review of Austrian Economics. 18 (2): 179-194; http://www.gmu.edu/rae/archives/VOL18_2_2005/4_Barnett.pdf

Barnett, William II and Walter E. Block. 2004. “On the Optimum Quantity of Money,” Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 39-52; http://www.mises.org/journals/qjae/pdf/qjae7_1_4.pdfhttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-Optimum-Quantity-of-Money%2C-Once-Again-Barnett-Block/2d43f6dbc3bebfcd9790ed67a35b2fd211374779

Block, Walter E. 2004. “Are Alienability and the Apriori of Argument Logically Incompatible?” Dialogue, Vol. 1, No. 1. http://www.uni-svishtov.bg/dialog/2004/256gord6.pdf

Block, Walter E. 2003. “Toward a Libertarian Theory of Inalienability: A Critique of Rothbard, Barnett, Gordon, Smith, Kinsella and Epstein,” Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol.17, No. 2, Spring, pp. 39-85; http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/17_2/17_2_3.pdf

Block, Walter E. 1998. “A Libertarian Case for Free Immigration,” Journal of Libertarian Studies: An Interdisciplinary Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, summer, pp. 167-186; http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/13_2/13_2_4.pdf

Best regards,

Walter

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This conversation pertains to this publication:

Block, Walter E. 2022. “Recycling in North Vancouver.” March 11;

https://internationalman.com/articles/recycling-in-north-vancouver/

From: Matteo

Date: Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 3:19 AM

Subject: Fwd: Recycling in North Vancouver

To: Mona

Cc: Casey

Hi Walter – I was in the waste business for seven years, selling waste incinerators with energy production from waste.

In Europe the detailed waste collection you mention was initiated already in the mid late eighties. The same exact process you mention – and as much as I don’t like hard core environmentalists – I can tell you that it is the best way to go – except for the fee charged by the governments.

North America has been way behind waste management and waste collection. Single stream waste collection ( basically throwing all the waste in a black bag) is a waste of precious resources. It’s hard or impossible to recycle paper, plastics, and other resources once they are stuck with oils, food waste and other waste.

I can tell you that in my household I recycle 97 percent. Basically, the only thing i end up throwing away is the dust on the floor. It’s a habit by now. And I am a free spirit by all means and I don’t like ANY imposition ( I flew to India in December to escape restrictions in Europe, screw’em. By the way in India, they have horrible waste management habits.

I do agree on the economics side of it. There would be a line of people taking their recyclables if people would get paid for it, but that is a multifaceted issue due to the fact that, indeed, governments have taken up the monopoly of waste collection. It’s twisted. But I still tag along because nothing is infinite, resources are finite, and it’s better to recycle.

Matteo

Dear Matteo:

I agree with you, but only partially.

Single stream waste collection ( basically throwing all the waste in a black bag) is indeed a waste of precious resources at certain prices. But, at other prices, recycling is a waste of precious resources. It ALL depends upon the price.

Yes, nothing is infinite, yes, resources are finite, but it by no means logically follows that it’s better to recycle. It is true a low costs of human labor, and high values of resources, but not the other way around. Should a doctor or a lawyer or a tech nerd who’s time is worth $500 per hour recycle newsprint, at which job he can produce $5 per hour worth of resources? Not if you want to be economically efficient. This would be a loss of $498/ hour.

But you make an excellent point about “There would be a line of people taking their recyclables if people would get paid for it” that is, if they were paid more for their recycling efforts than they could earn by engaging in other market pursuits.

Jewelers recycle gold dust since it is so valuable. No one recycles tissue paper, since it is so cheap.

Best regards,

Walter

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Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 9:52 AM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Survey of US Economists on $15 Federal Minimum Wage

In 2019, you graciously participated in a baseline survey about the $15/hour federal minimum wage. We are now conducting a follow-up survey of US economists’ opinions regarding a $15 minimum wage on behalf of a public policy and research organization. Would you please take a moment to provide your confidential feedback?

Click here to complete the survey!

If the link above does not work, please copy and paste the following link into your browser: https://minwage.questionpro.com

The results will be used to provide economists’ perspectives to politicians, policy leaders, the media and other representatives.

Thank you for considering this request. If you have any questions about the research, please contact me at 412.337.6613 or lcorder@andrew.cmu.edu.

Thank you.

Lloyd

On Mon, Feb 21, 2022 at 3:04 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Dear Lloyd:

I should have stopped filling out your biased survey when I saw your first question: you left no option for getting rid of the min wage entirely. I’m such a wuss.

Best regards,

Walter

From: Lloyd

Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 12:09 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Re: Survey of US Economists on $15 Federal Minimum Wage

Thanks for filling it out. I’ll keep your note when I put the summary together.

On Mon, Feb 21, 2022 at 3:40 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Dear Lloyd:

Why didn’t you include that option?

Best regards,

Walter

From: Lloyd

Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 12:41 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Re: Survey of US Economists on $15 Federal Minimum Wage

There was one for 750 and below, which I thought covered that. Thanks.

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 12:43 PM

To: ‘Lloyd

Subject: RE: Survey of US Economists on $15 Federal Minimum Wage

Dear Lloyd:

Yes, that’s the one I chose. But still ….

Yes, it “covered” it. But don’t you want to know even more? You gave so many other options.

Check your bias, I suggest.

Best regards,

Walter

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From: Max

Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 9:37 PM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Synthetic A Priori Question

Hi Walter,

My name is Max. I’m an educator/writer from Los Angeles, I’ve been a libertarian for about 10 years, and I’m a big fan of your work. I watched the debate between yourself and David Friedman and thought you did a great job. Since then, I’ve been arguing with David on Facebook about his odd views about negative time preference.

While I’d firmly call myself an Austrian, I did start to question something when you were talking about synthetic a priori statements. You gave a non-economic example of “Parallel lines can’t cross,” although this example immediately seemed to me like a regular a priori tautology because the rule of “not crossing” is necessarily contained in the definition of “parallel.” Am I missing something here? Similarly with the building block of Austrian economics, the statement “Man acts” could arguably also be a tautology because I would think that acting is a necessary component of the definition of a human being as it’s being used in such an economic statement. So as you can see, I’m not completely convinced now about whether synthetic a priori’s exist, and I’d love to know where you think I might be going wrong.

I think one of the fundamental ways you defined synthetic a priori as opposed to something like a tautology is that it “tells us something about the real world,” and yet, I think tautologies can also tell us new information about the real world. When we break down a word into different words or phrases, we tend to elucidate meaning (meaning that can enrich our understanding of the world). For example, even a tautology we could agree on, “all bachelors are unmarried,” gives us information about the real world to those who don’t already know what a bachelor is. In the realm of morality, I believe we can derive the NAP and property rights from tautological statements about humanity.

I hope this rant doesn’t seem too abrasive. I’m still a big fan, and right now, whether I believe synthetic a prioris exist or not, I still think Austrianism and praxeology itself are sound.

Hope your semester is going well and even if you don’t have the time to answer, thank you for taking the time to read this.

Sincerely,

Max

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Monday, February 21, 2022 10:18 PM

To: ‘Max

Subject: RE: Synthetic A Priori Question

Dear Max:

Not abrasive at all. If abrasive, then abrasive is a good thing!

I might be wrong on parallel lines. I’ll have to think about that one.

Yes, tautologies tell us a little bit about the real world: but only how we use language.

Whereas, in sharp contrast, synthetic aprioris tell us much more than mere definitions. I don’t think “man” is defined as being an “actor.” Man is just a species. Ants, too, are a species, and, yet, I don’t think they act, choose, etc. Rather, they are driven by instincts. A straight line is the shortest distance between two points does more than tell us how words are defined. Even David Friedman is confused on this issue, thinking it has something to do with Euclid. The minimum wage creates unemployment for workers with productivities specified by that law certainly says more than how words are used.

Best regards,

Walter

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From: David

Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2022 7:32 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Question about evictionism

Dear Walter,

Yesterday in Colombia abortion was legalized up to 24 weeks of gestation. I am neither “pro-life” nor “pro-choice,” and I know a bit about your theory of evictionism. You claim that two facts must be distinguished in abortion: the expulsion of the fetus from the mother’s body and the fetus´ death. Evictionism defends the former, but not the latter. Likewise, you argue that this expulsion should be done in the most gentle way possible.

In this regard, I have some questions. In the first place: the only way to carry out this eviction would be through advanced technologies such as artificial wombs, however, as long as these technologies do not become widespread, how could this gentile eviction be ensured?

On the other hand, in the case of Colombia’s almost total legalization of abortion, would an evictionist be for or against?

Thank you.

Best regards,

David

Tu ne cede malis sed contra audentior ito

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2022 9:41 AM

To: ‘David

Subject: RE: Question about evictionism

Dear David:

1.Right now, with no advanced technologies, the evicted fetus of less than 6 months old will die, the evicted fetus in the last trimester can live. Advanced technologies will decrease the age of the fetus necessary to live. For example, with them, the fetus in the last 4 months can live, not only the last 3 months.

2.The evictionist opposes abortion. Abortion = evictionism + murder.

This book is relevant to your question:

Block, Walter E. 2021. Evictionism: The compromise solution to the pro-life pro-choice debate controversy. Springer Publishing Company.

https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-16-5014-7;

For reviewers: https://www.springer.com/gp/reviewershttps://www.springer.com/gp/instructors/textbook-copy-request-us/17556774;

https://smc-link.s4hana.ondemand.com/eu/data-buffer/sap/public/cuan/link/100/C2AA39A530336AC2B82AE9F4BCD463ABDE73A280/pixel.gif?_L54AD1F204_=c2NlbmFyaW89TUxPUEVOJnRlbmFudD1teTMwNDQyNC5zNGhhbmEub25kZW1hbmQuY29t;

https://dam.springernature.com/preview/8qkJz6AE4NVAo0r_q1x9IT/previews/maxWidth_600.png?&authcred=YXBpX2V4dGVybjpndWVzdA;

<https://smc-link.s4hana.ondemand.com/eu/data-buffer/sap/public/cuan/link/100/C2AA39A530336AC2B82AE9F4BCD463ABDE73A280?_V_=2&_K11_=479FAFAD58110FE1BC920C170EC676450FAD8B67&_L54AD1F204_=c2NlbmFyaW89TUxDUEcmdGVuYW50PW15MzA0NDI0LnM0aGFuYS5vbmRlbWFuZC5jb20mdGFyZ2V0PWh0dHA6Ly93d3cuc3ByaW5nZXIuY29tP3NhcC1vdXRib3VuZC1pZD1DMkFBMzlBNTMwMzM2QUMyQjgyQUU5RjRCQ0Q0NjNBQkRFNzNBMjgw&_K13_=251&_K14_=8f04f66beb2626ad9394eacc16811b448131ace07eb93e987cff8b495fe74f45>;

https://dam.springernature.com/preview/8qkJz6AE4NVAo0r_q1x9IT/previews/maxWidth_600.png?&authcred=YXBpX2V4dGVybjpndWVzdA;

A unique perspective to the pro-life, pro-choice debate. Explores themes of property rights in relation to human life and rights. Offers a balanced debate on the topic of human rights.

Best regards,

Walter

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From: Mario

Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2022 11:18 AM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Question

Greetings Professor Block, I am a Lebanese libertarian and adherent to the Austrian school of economics. I write for Ici Beyrouth and am trying to spread libertarian – or anarcho-capitalist – ideas in Lebanon.

I would like to ask you the following question: What gives a country a good reputation, in your opinion? Protection of private property and minimal government intervention play a significant role, but is it enough?

Thank you.

Dear Mario:

I can’t think of much more to promote a good reputation than protection of private property and minimal government intervention. Oh, yes, there are dozens of other things: sound money, no economic regulations, free trade, no licensing, no minimum wages, no rent controls, etc., but these are merely logical implications of protection of private property and minimal government intervention.

Perhaps this book of mine is relevant to your question:

Gwartney, James, Robert W. Lawson and Walter E. Block. 1996. Economic Freedom of the World, 1975-1995; Vancouver, B.C. Canada: the Fraser Institute (308 pages);  http://www.amazon.ca/Economic-freedom-world-1975-1995-Gwartney/dp/0889751579/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336605884&sr=1-1http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/pdf/catalogue.pdf; isbn: 0-88975-157-9;

http://www.fraserinstitute.org/researchandpublications/publications/7094.aspxhttp://www.fraserinstitute.org/research/economic-freedom-of-the-world-1975-1995

info@fraserinstitute.orgpublications@fraserinstitute.org ^

Best regards,

Walter

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Hi Walter Block,

Your cloud recording is now available.

Topic: walter block’s Zoom Meeting

Date: Feb 22, 2022 01:02 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

You can copy the recording information below and share with others:

https://loyno.zoom.us/rec/share/w60jGEl4PQ_Q4fiNb8FDedtLUTQrt8OpzJHv2sahEZSCrD6gjp7V8UAMjA_-WDjd.ZDN_8n2Ic7Q3Y9-n (Passcode: u7rG*C5b)

Walter E. Block, Ph.D.

The post On The Minimum Wage Law appeared first on LewRockwell.

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Recently, a colleague of mine at Loyola University New Orleans invited me to give a guest lecture to her class on business ethics. Here ‘tis (use the passcode!):

https://loyno.zoom.us/rec/share/_nkZ00qMpWhEYTeoMjqSSqYkYYqTg6tyBK_AgCW-UDRY1KH-Cdf2hcJUVe0FNEIC.yaUogV3SVYi8DotD

(Passcode: BR9iGsR=)

See the important question asked of me by Anthony Cesario, at the very end, and my answer to it.

Walter E. Block, Ph.D.

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From: Garrick

Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 7:57 PM

To: [email protected]

Subject: Questions on privatization of land from a follower

Hi,

I hope you are having a great week. I wrote this email with the intention that you could clarify a bit some aspects of privatization on land that I don’t think have been directly assessed. I am a follower of the ASC and a big fan of yours, I haven’t read your books yet but I have seen your great conferences; either way, by the title in your books I see that you have covered almost all aspects of privatization of natural resources following the logic stated in the ethics of liberty, I see that you have specifically applied the ethics to different scenarios with different characteristics (oceans, highways etc).

I wanted to ask you on some specific types of land and how would the logic of privatization work in those cases. I don’t think these specific types of land have ever been discussed, and if they have been I would really like if you could give me some references for me to research a bit more.

In this case I’m talking about Volcanoes, Mountains, Valleys, mountain ranges and old pyramids, things that naturally are consider as natural heritage. Would the privatization of land in this cases be anything special? how would it be done? How to argue that they belong to everyone as they are national heritage? How would the negative externalities of owning some of these types of land be solved?

Best regards, that’s all for now, I hope to hear from you soon,

Dear Garrick:

I don’t see why the privatization process of any of these things, Volcanoes, Mountains, Valleys, mountain ranges and old pyramids, would be different from that of ordinary land or water.

Here is my series of books on privatization:

Block, Walter E. 2009. The Privatization of Roads and Highways: Human and Economic Factors; Auburn, AL: The Mises Institute; https://store.mises.org/Privatization-of-Roads-and-Highways-Human-and-Economic-Factors-The-P581.aspxhttp://www.amazon.com/Privatization-Roads-And-Highways-Factors/dp/1279887303/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336605800&sr=1-1; available for free here: http://mises.org/books/roads_web.pdfhttp://mises.org/daily/3416http://www.walterblock.com/wp-content/uploads/publications/radical_privatization.pdf; audio: http://store.mises.org/Privatization-of-Roads-and-Highways-Audiobook-P11005.aspxhttp://www.audible.com/pd/Business/The-Privatization-of-Roads-and-Highways-Audiobook/B0167IT18K?tag=misesinsti-20http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=bf16b152ccc444bdbbcc229e4&id=6cbc90577b&e=54244ea97d;

http://www.sanfranciscoreviewofbooks.com/2017/09/book-review-privatization-of-roads-and.html

Block, Walter E. and Peter Lothian Nelson. 2015. Water Capitalism: The Case for Privatizing Oceans, Rivers, Lakes, and Aquifers. New York City, N.Y.: Lexington Books, Rowman and Littlefield; https://store.mises.org/Water-Capitalism-The-Case-for-Privatizing-Oceans-Rivers-Lakes-and-Aquifers-P11051.aspxhttps://rowman.com/ISBN/9781498518802/Water-Capitalism-The-Case-for-Privatizing-Oceans-Rivers-Lakes-and-Aquifershttps://mises.org/library/case-privatizing-oceans-and-rivers

scathing review: https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R1SMO4B0T1AWM5/ref=cm_cr_dp_d_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1498518826https://store.mises.org/-P11051.aspx

Nelson, Peter Lothian and Walter E. Block. 2018. Space capitalism: the case for privatizing space travel and colonization. Palgrave Macmillan; https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-74651-7https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/3319746502/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&condition=new&qid=1531187909&sr=8-1&linkCode=sl2&tag=economicpolicyjournal-20&linkId=959e913e476f48b289a16223d557a826http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2018/07/new-walter-block-book-space-capitalism.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+economicpolicyjournal%2FKpwH+%28EconomicPolicyJournal.com%29https://filling-space.com/2019/01/18/space-capitalism-laissez-faire-in-the-heavens/

Best regards,

Walter

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https://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/correspondence-with-a-former-teacher-of-mine/

From: Walter Block <[email protected]>

Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2022 10:19 AM

Cc: ‘Alan

Subject: RE: video

I am making him anonymous to save him from possible embarrassment. He was very helpful to me when I was a student, and my appreciation for him is far greater than the discomfort he now gives me.

From: Walter Block [mailto:[email protected]]

Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2022 4:34 AM

Cc: Alan

Subject: FW: video

Dear R:

My colleague Alan and I have just finished publishing our very pro Israel book. Briefly, its thesis is that this country is more than justified in its treatment of the Arabs, Palestinians, vis a vis land claims.

Block, Walter E. and Alan Futerman. 2021.  The Classical Liberal Case for Israel. With commentary by Benjamin Netanyahu. Springer Publishing Company;

https://rd.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-16-3953-1;

ISBN_978-981-16-3952-4 [Print]; 978-981-16-3953-1 [ebook]

for book reviewers: https://www.springer.com/gp/reviewers

To purchase: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-16-3953-1

https://books.google.com.ar/books?id=vyBMEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=es&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false;

https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Walter-Block/dp/9811639523/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_US=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&keywords=The+Classical+Liberal+Case+for+Israel&qid=1637966038&qsid=134-3849508-4542041&s=books&sr=1-1&sres=B09KX5BVMT&srpt=ABIS_BOOK;

https://www.springer.com/gp/instructors/textbook-copy-request-us/17556774;

Offers a unique perspective on the State of Israel based on classical liberalism and libertarianism. Provides a thorough understanding of Israel’s origin and development. Explores different topics on Israel, including Anti-Zionism

As you can imagine, we are very pro Israel. But we now want to “attack” Israel for undermining its economy with all sorts of needless regulations. Our thought is that this country can better protect itself against its enemies with a strong economy, rather than continuing to shoot itself in the foot, and higher up, with socialism, etc.

But we need a third co author, one who is intimately familiar with all of the Israeli deviations from free enterprise. We two are not.

We would be delighted if you would be our third co author. If not, perhaps you can recommend someone who would be appropriate.

We have already written a chapter on housing intended for this book.  See attached.

Best regards,

Walter

From: R

Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2022 1:30 AM

To: Walter Block <[email protected]>;

Cc: Alan

Subject: RE: video

Dear Walter,

I am afraid I am going to disappoint you. Reading your letter I feel I disagree with you both on politics and economics.  Last year the Falk Institute published a comprehensive review of the Israeli economy over the last 25 years. It was published by Cambridge University Press and it is called “The Israeli Economy 1995 – 2017 – Light and Shadow in a Market Economy”. I suggest you read it to get a better view of the strength and weaknesses of Israel from the economic perspective.  If you decide to continue with your project you may perhaps find among the authors of the various chapters somebody who knows something on the Israeli Economy and is more inclined to your views and your research strategy (Neither Griliches, Becker nor Mincer stated the conclusions of their research before they looked at the data). Yours, R

Dear R:

Sorry to disappoint an old favorite teacher of mine.

Thanks for that lead. Alan and I will follow up on that and are very grateful to you for it.

Mary Tyler Moore, in her tv show, used as a motto, “Love is all around us.” I say that “the evidence is all around us that Israel still has strong vestiges of its early interventionistic, socialistic economic policies.”

Here’s one bit of evidence for this claim that I had a bit to do with gathering:

Gwartney, James, Robert W. Lawson and Walter E. Block. 1996. Economic Freedom of the World, 1975-1995; Vancouver, B.C. Canada: the Fraser Institute; http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/pdf/catalogue.pdf; isbn: 0-88975-157-9

This book ranks the economic freedom of many countries. Israel does not come off too well.

When and if you do research on the minimum wage, rent control or free trade, would you be willing to “state … (your expectations regarding) the conclusions of (your) research before (you) looked at the data?” I’ll betcha you would. That is all I did. Neither of us was born yesterday. Even logical positivists, to say nothing of Austrian economists like me, should be willing to do so.

Another bit of evidence: “The Good Cop,” an Israeli television show which is one of the funniest comedies ever made. If you haven’t yet seen it, you absolutely MUST do so. This was the inspiration for our chapter on housing. They also illustrated the effects of egg marketing boards. If you aren’t aware of it, and follow through on my suggestion, you’ll owe me big. And in this way I can repay you to a teeny tiny amount for being my teacher.

I’m disappointed in a few of my former students. I hope and trust you’re not too disappointed with me for not following the “research strategy (of) Griliches, Becker nor Mincer.” By the way, I’ll betcha neither they nor you really follow this head in the sand research strategy.

Best regards,

Walter

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9:39 am on January 28, 2022

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