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From: Cameron
Sent: Sunday, February 16, 2020 8:21 AM
To: wblock@loyno.edu
Subject: Child Protective Services

Good morning! My girlfriend works for DSS in North Carolina. She is monitoring a supervised visit for a child and parents this morning. The child was placed in foster care because the parents made the child sleep in a dog crate for punishment. I told her I would ask you for reading material on the subject since you have written on every subject known to man. Please help me!

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Sunday, February 16, 2020 12:50 PM

To: Cameron

Subject: RE: Child Protective Services

Dear Cameron:

Thanks for your kind words.

Sorry I can’t be of more help to you than to say that child abuse is a grey area. Here’s a reading on that:

Block, Walter E. and William Barnett II. 2008. “Continuums” Journal Etica e Politica / Ethics & Politics, Vol. 1, pp. 151-166, June; http://www2.units.it/~etica/http://www2.units.it/~etica/2008_1/BLOCKBARNETT.pdf

I also have some material on spanking children which might be of interest:

December 9, 2013. Debate: Walter Block and Stefan Molyneux, Freedomain Radio on spanking children. Michael DeMarco; operations@freedomainradio.com; skype: michaelmdemarco; 716-533-2171;

Video: http://youtu.be/EgCmoVbdYtE;

MP3:

http://cdn.media.freedomainradio.com/feed/FDR_2552_Walter_Block_Debate.mp3

;

http://libertariannerds.com/2016/11/19/wizardly-wisdom-reality-anxiety-ep-

4-darien-sumner-from-bumblingbees-net/

Block, Walter E. 2016. Starving Child, Part III: Spanking Children; November 5; https://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/starving-child-part-iii-spanking-chil

dren/

Mosquito, Bionic. 2016. “Walter Hits One Out of the Park.” November 5; http://bionicmosquito.blogspot.com/2016/11/walter-hits-one-out-of-park.htm

l

July 16, 2017. Vancouver, BC, Canada. Walter Block debates Tim Moen, Leader of the Canadian Libertarian Party.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/

436 W Pender Street, downtown Vancouver at 2:30pm.  Topic: Is spanking children compatible with libertarianism? Contact: Victor Pross:

artpross@hotmail.com; or go here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/1831218550528628/?acontex

t=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2229%22%2C%22ref_notif_type%22%3A%22admin_plan_mall_acti

vity%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&notif_t=admin_plan_mall_act

ivity&notif_id=1498028247599964. Open to the public.

https://youtu.be/J6Kto38tk1I

July 21, 2013. Interview with Steve Patterson, FEE

http://libertariannerds.com/2016/11/19/wizardly-wisdom-reality-anxiety-ep-

4-darien-sumner-

from-bumblingbees-net/

additional bibliography

Block, 1976, 2003, 2004, 2011, 2013; Block and Fleischer, 2010; Evers, 1978A, 1978B; Feser, 2004; Rothbard, 1982, chapter 14.

Block, Walter E. 2008 [1976]. Defending the Undefendable. Auburn, AL: The Mises Institute; http://mises.org/books/defending.pdf

Block, Walter E. 2003.  “Libertarianism vs. Objectivism; A Response to Peter Schwartz,” Reason Papers, Vol. 26, Summer, pp. 39-62; http://www.reasonpapers.com/pdf/26/rp_26_4.pdf  Nambla, child sexuality, child abuse

Block, Walter E. 2004. “Libertarianism, Positive Obligations and Property Abandonment: Children’s Rights,” International Journal of Social Economics; Vol. 31, No. 3, pp 275-286; http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContainer.do?containerType=Issue&containerId=18709http://www.walterblock.com/publications.php#recent-arts;

http://www.walterblock.com/publications/block-children.pdfhttp://www.walterblock.com/wp-content/uploads/publications/block-children.pdfhttps://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/03068290410518256https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/03068290410518256?fullSc=1&journalCode=ijse

Block, Walter E. 2011. “Terri Schiavo: A Libertarian Analysis” Journal of Libertarian Studies; Vol. 22, pp. 527–536; http://mises.org/journals/jls/22_1/22_1_26.pdf

December 9, 2013. Debate: Walter Block and Stefan Molyneux, Freedomain Radio on spanking children. Michael DeMarco; operations@freedomainradio.com; skype: michaelmdemarco; 716-533-2171; Video: http://youtu.be/EgCmoVbdYtE

MP3: http://cdn.media.freedomainradio.com/feed/FDR_2552_Walter_Block_Debate.mp3

July 16, 2017. Vancouver, BC, Canada. Walter Block debates Tim Moen, Leader of the Canadian Libertarian Party. https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/

Topic: Is spanking children compatible with libertarianism? Contact: Victor Pross: artpross@hotmail.com; or go here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1800169280300222/1831218550528628/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2229%22%2C%22ref_notif_type%22%3A%22admin_plan_mall_activity%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&notif_t=admin_plan_mall_activity&notif_id=1498028247599964. Open to the public. https://youtu.be/J6Kto38tk1I

Block, Walter E. and Michael Fleischer. 2010. “How Would An Anarchist Society Handle Child Abuse?” October 13; https://www.lewrockwell.com/block/block167.html

Evers, Williamson M. 1978A. “Rawls and Children.” The Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 109-114; http://mises.org/journals/jls/2_2/2_2_2.pdf

Evers, Williamson M. 1978B. “The Law of Omissions and Neglect of Children,” The Journal of Libertarian Studies Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 1 – 10; http://mises.org/journals/jls/2_1/2_1_1.pdf

Feser, Edward. 2004. “Self-Ownership, Abortion and the Rights of Children.” Journal of Libertarian Studies. Vol. 18, No. 3, Summer, pp. 91-114; http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/18_3/18_3_5.pdf

Rothbard, Murray N. 1998 [1982]. The Ethics of Liberty, New York: New York University Press. http://www.mises.org/rothbard/ethics/ethics.asp

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3:13 am on May 3, 2020

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Letter 1

From: Steven Jancarek

Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2020 5:53 PM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Interview for Research Paper

Hello Professor Block, I hope you’re having a blessed week. I am a student at a community college in Virginia who plans to transfer to George Mason University as an economics major for the 2020 fall semester, and I’m a big fan of you and your work. I’m currently working on a research paper that covers the Great Depression in a similar format to the great Murray Rothbard’s America’s Great Depression. One of the requirements for my paper is that I get an interview with a credible source, and if it’s not too much of an inconvenience, would you be willing to answer a few questions pertaining to the ABCT, the Fed, etc. via email exchange? I understand that you’re a very busy man with other students and obligations, so having your time would be a great honor to me.

Thank you,

Bryce Jancarek

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 7:25 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Letter 2

Dear Bryce:

Yes, I’ll do this, but only on one condition: that you seriously consider transferring to Loyola instead. See below for support of Loyola in general. We have almost 10 profs who are in the free enterprise camp, and a few dozen students with similar interests. You’d be among friends, here.

In particular, if you go to Mason, and then also get your phd there, you get only one set of profs. If you come here first, and then go there, you get two sets of profs. Two is better than one. More intellectual diversity

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 3

From: Steven Jancarek

Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 5:51 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Re: Interview for Research Paper

I’ll have to call Loyola and speak with a counselor to see if my classes will transfer over nicely. If so, I’ll absolutely take serious consideration in transferring there and will apply for the Walter Block scholarship, which is certainly a game changer. Loyola, as well as Auburn and NYU, has been on my radar since high school, and I’d love to be a student under the economics program that you and others have built there. I will begin my application to Loyola, and follow-up in another email with questions as soon as possible. Thank you so much for your help and bringing me awareness to your scholarship, Professor Block.

Letter 4

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 2:21 PM

To: ‘Steven Jancarek’

Subject: RE: Interview for Research Paper

Dear Steve/Bryce:

You’ve got a deal. Yes, I’m willing to answer a few questions pertaining to the ABCT, the Fed, etc. via email exchange

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 5

How would you explain to someone the Austrian Business Cycle Theory in fairly basic terms?

<< Here’s the best reading on that issue:

Rothbard, Murray N. 1969. Economic Depressions: Their Cause and Cure, Lansing, Michigan: Constitutional Alliance; http://mises.org/tradcycl/econdepr.asphttp://mises.org/daily/3127/Economic-Depressions-Their-Cause-and-Cure

Keynesians often charge the idea that the word had been run on classical economics, the gold standard, free markets, etc. prior to the Great Depression and it failed to prevent it or find a solution. However, this is factually not the case, between the Federal Reserve’s credit expansion of the 1920’s and Hoover’s irresponsible proto-New Deal policies deviating far from what economists at the time would have called for. How would you challenge this assessment?

<<Here’s an excellent challenge:

Woods, Thomas E. Jr. 2009A. Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. Washington D.C.: Regnery Publishing

In a 1979 interview of Friedrich Hayek, he states “I agree with Milton Friedman that once the Crash had occurred, the Federal Reserve System pursued a silly deflationary policy.” Do you think this view is compatible with the Austrian Business Cycle Theory, and if not, what do you believe was Hayek’s blindspot in this case?

<< I think Hayek is mistaken. Read this on that:

Rothbard, Murray N. [1963] 1975. America’s Great Depression. Kansas City: Sheed and Ward, http://www.mises.org/rothbard/agd.pdf

You’ve written some very sharp responses to different ABCT criticisms in the past, and for me, your response to Gordon Tullock’s Why the Austrians Are Wrong About Depressions first comes to mind. What criticism(s), Keynesian, Monetarist, or otherwise, do you believe to be most important for Austrians to rebuke? What have you found to be most challenging, whether the criticism(s) be sneaky or thoughtful?

<< thanks for your kind comment about this essay of mine:

Barnett, William II and Walter E. Block. 2005. “Professor Tullock on Austrian Business Cycle Theory,” Advances in Austrian Economics, Vol. 8, pp. 431-443; http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1880562

What should Austrians rebuke in non Austrian theory? Anything. Everything.

In leaving the classical gold standard in 1933-1934, did this sustain FDR’s New Deal, and if so, how? Were there any other notable economic effects this change had at the time?

Sorry I can’t answer all of your questions, apart from recommending readings to you. I hate to reinvent the wheel. There are some more readings on this below:

Did the UK’s choice to redefine the value of the pound to $4.86 from its market value of $3.50 after WWI make it politically feasible for the US to leave the gold standard almost 10 years later, or was it inevitable?

<<Nothing in economics is inevitable.

What are some parallels you see in monetary policy prior to the Great Depression and today?

<< in both cases, we are in the boom part of the biz cycle.

What would be your ideal solution to fixing our monetary system?

<<Pure 100% gold standard

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 10:31 AM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Block, 1999; Block and Barnett, 2008;  de Soto, 2006; Gleason, 2019;  Greaves, 1995; Greenspan, 1966; Hazlitt, 1965, 1980; Herbener, 2002; Howden, 2008; Hulsmann, 2008; Kaza, 1996; Mises, 1952, 1981; Mundell, 1981; Murphy, 2010; North, 1986; Palyi, 1972; Paul, 1985; Paul and Lehrman, 1982; Rader, 1980; Reisman, 1996, 2000; Rothbard, 1962, 1963, 1975, 1983, 1985, 1991, 1992; Selgin, 2015; Sennholz, 1975A, 1975B, 1979, 1985; Vieira, 2002

Block, Walter E. 1999. “The Gold Standard: A Critique of Friedman, Mundell, Hayek, Greenspan,” Managerial Finance, Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 15-33; http://giorgio.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContainer.do?containerType=Issue&containerId=13529http://www.mises.org/etexts/goldcritique.pdf

Block, Walter E. and William Barnett II. 2008. “Going (back) to gold money with no government gold: blood in the streets?” Indian Journal of Economics & Business, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 185-193; http://www.ijeb.com/Year2008_Dec.htm

de Soto, Jesus Huerta. 2006. Money, Bank Credit, and Economic Cycles, translated by Melinda A. Stroup, ch. 9; Auburn, AL: Ludwig von Mises Institute; http://www.mises.org/books/desoto.pdf

Gleason, Mike. 2019. “Why Powell Fears a Gold Standard.” July 20;

https://mises.org/wire/why-powell-fears-gold-standard?utm_source=Mises+Institute+Subscriptions&utm_campaign=12e674bcd6-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_9_21_2018_9_59_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8b52b2e1c0-12e674bcd6-227976965

Greaves, Bettina Bien. 1995. “How to Return to the Gold Standard.” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty; Vol. 45, No. 11, November; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=4848

Greenspan, Alan. 1966. “Gold and Economic Freedom,” Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, Ayn Rand, ed., New York: Signet: 1967, pp. 96-101 (reprinted from The Objectivist, 1966); http://www.321gold.com/fed/greenspan/1966.html

Hazlitt, Henry. 1965. “Back to Gold?” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, Vol. 15, No.  10, October; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=7670

Hazlitt, Henry. 1980. “How to Return to Gold?” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, Vol. 30, No.  9, September; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=458

Herbener, Jeffrey M. 2002. “After the Age of Inflation: Austrian Proposals for Monetary Reform,” The Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 5, No. 4, Winter: 5-19.

Howden, David. 2008. ‘Stability of Gold Standard and its Selected Consequences: A Comment’, Procesos de Mercado: Revista Europea de Economía Política 5(1), 159-175.

Hülsmann, J. G. 2008. The Ethics of Money Production; Ludwig von Mises Institute, Auburn AL.

Kaza, Greg. 1996. “Is There a Case for the Gold Standard?”  The Intercollegiate Review. http://www.mmisi.org/ir/32_01/kaza.pdf

Mises, Ludwig. 1952. Epilogue to The Theory of Money and Credit , “The United States’ Return to a Sound Currency.”

Mises, Ludwig von. 1981. The Theory of Money and Credit, Indianapolis: LibertyPress/LibertyClassics, ch. 23.

Mundell, Robert. 1981. “Gold Would Serve into the 21st Century.” Wall Street Journal, September 30.

Murphy, Robert P. 2010. “Gold: The Market’s Global Currency.” November 11;

http://mises.org/daily/4841

North, Gary. 1986. Honest Money: Biblical Principles of Money and Banking, chaps 11-13

Palyi, Melchior. 1972. The Twilight of Gold 1914-1936: Myths and Realities. H. Regnery Co

Paul, Ron.  1985. “The Political and Economic Agenda for a Real Gold Standard,” delivered at the Mises Institute’s 1985 conference on the gold standard; final chapter in The Gold Standard: Perspectives in the Austrian School: http://www.mises.org/books/goldstandard.pdf;

http://www.mises.org/story/2826

Paul, Ron and Lehrman, Lewis. 1982.U.S. Gold Commission (September). The Case for Gold: A Minority Report of the U.S. Gold Commission. Washington, DC: Cato Institute (2d ed. Ludwig von Mises Institute, 2007). |

Rader, Randall R. 1980. “Remonetizing Gold, Again.” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty. Vol. 30, No. 8, September; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=461

Reisman, George. 1996. Capitalism. Ottawa, Il.: Jameson Books, pp. 951-963

Reisman, George. 2000. “The Goal of Monetary Reform,” The quarterly journal of Austrian economics VOL. 3, NO. 3 (FALL): 3–18

Rothbard, Murray N. 1962. “The Case For a 100 Percent Gold Dollar.”  Leland Yeager (ed.), In Search of a Monetary Constitution.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 94-136.  Reprinted as The Case For a 100 Percent Gold Dollar, Washington, DC: Libertarian Review Press, 1974.  http://mises.org/rothbard/100percent.pdf

Rothbard, Murray N. 1963, 1985, 1990 What Has Government Done to Our Money? Auburn, AL.: Mises Institute; http://www.mises.org/rothbard/rothmoney.pdf

Rothbard, Murray N. 1975. “Gold vs. Fluctuating Fiat Exchange Rates.”  H. F. Sennholz (ed.), Gold is Money, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, pp. 24-40.  Reprinted in The Logic of Action One: Method, Money, and the Austrian School.  Glos, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 1997, pp. 350-363.

Rothbard, Murray N. 1983. The Mystery of Banking.  New York: Richardson and Snyder.

Rothbard, Murray N. 1985. “The Case for a Genuine Gold Dollar.”  L. H. Rockwell, The Gold Standard: An Austrian Perspective.  Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, pp. 1-17.  Reprinted in The Logic of Action One: Method, Money, and the Austrian School.  Glos, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 1997, pp. 364-383.

Rothbard, Murray. 1991. The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar. Auburn, AL: The Ludwig von Mises Institute; http://mises.org/rothbard/100percent.pdf

Rothbard, Murray N. 1992. “Aurophobia: or, Free Banking on What Standard?  A Review of Gold, Greenbacks and the Constitution, by Richard M. Timberlake,” Review of Austrian Economics, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 97-108; http://www.mises.org/journals/rae/pdf/rae6_1_4.pdf

Selgin, George. “Ten Things Every Economist Should Know about the Gold Standard.” June 4; http://www.alt-m.org/2015/06/04/ten-things-every-economist-should-know-about-the-gold-standard-2/

Sennholz, Hans, ed. 1975A. The Luster of Gold. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press

Sennholz, Hans. 1975B. Gold is Money. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut

Sennholz, Hans. 1979. Age of Inflation, Western Islands; chap. VI

Sennholz, Hans. 1985. Money and Freedom, Spring Mills, Penn.: Libertarian Press, chap. 8

Vieira, Edwin. 2002. Pieces of Eight, 2nd ed., Fredericksburg, VA: Sheridan

Letter 6

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 5:55 PM Steven Jancarek  wrote:

My apologies Professor Block. I had not seen the earlier emails. I have not yet sent any questions because I am still in the research process and I’m doing as much reading as I can. I just read through Lionel Robbins The Great Depression and am currently revisiting Rothbard’s What Has Government Done To Our Money? in order to write with more clarity and detail on the shifting monetary phases of the central banks at the time, which I’m feeling very unsatisfied with in my writing at the moment. Truthfully I am also feeling self-conscious and I’m worried I’ll ask something you’ll find incredibly stupid or so simple that you’ll feel this was a waste of time. But I see now that in taking my time I’ve exhausted some of yours as well, and for that I do sincerely apologize. Nevertheless, I do have a handful of questions right now that would be very useful for my paper

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3:12 am on May 3, 2020

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From: Jon Trollston
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 12:05 AM
To: wblock@loyno.edu
Subject: Digital currencies with commodity backings

Hello mr Block, I am a fan, and i was wondering if you could point me towards a direction or if you have any insights as to how we could create a currency which the end user could use, akin to bitcoin but it would have backing by a commodity, to solve the issue of transacting with physical commodities over the internet. I don’t know if this makes sense. Just curious how it would play out.

Dear Jon:

This sounds like the gold standard to me.

Bagus, 2011; Block, 1999; Block and Barnett, 2008;  de Soto, 2006; Ebeling, 2000; Greaves, 1995. Hazlitt, 1965, 1980; Herbener, 2002; Hulsmann, 1998, 2008; Kaza, 1996; Laffer and Kadlec, 1981; Leconte, 2003; Mises, 1952, 1981; Mundell, 1981; Murphy, 2010; North, 1986; Paul, 1985; Rader, 1980; Reisman, 1996, 2000; Rothbard, 1962, 1994; Selgin, 2015; Sennholz, 1975, 1979, 1985; Siegel, 1984, Vieira, 2002

Bagus, Philipp. 2011. “Will There Be QE3, QE4, QE5…?” January 4; https://www.lewrockwell.com/orig10/bagus2.1.1.html

Block, Walter E. 1999. “The Gold Standard: A Critique of Friedman, Mundell, Hayek, Greenspan,” Managerial Finance, Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 15-33; http://giorgio.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContainer.do?containerType=Issue&containerId=13529http://www.mises.org/etexts/goldcritique.pdf

Block, Walter E. and William Barnett II. 2008. “Going (back) to gold money with no government gold: blood in the streets?” Indian Journal of Economics & Business, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 185-193; http://www.ijeb.com/Year2008_Dec.htm

de Soto, Jesus Huerta. 2006. Money, Bank Credit, and Economic Cycles, translated by Melinda A. Stroup, ch. 9; Auburn, AL: Ludwig von Mises Institute; http://www.mises.org/books/desoto.pdf

Ebeling, Richard M., ed. 2000.  “Selected Writings of Ludwig von Mises,” Vol. 3: ‘The Political Economy of International Reform and Reconstruction,’ (Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund)  Ch 6: “A Non-Inflationary Proposal for Postwar Monetary Reconstruction,” pp. 71-118

Greaves, Bettina Bien. 1995. “How to Return to the Gold Standard.” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty; Vol. 45, No. 11, November; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=4848

Hazlitt, Henry. 1965. “Back to Gold?” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, Vol. 15, No.  10, October; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=7670

Hazlitt, Henry. 1980. “How to Return to Gold?” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, Vol. 30, No.  9, September; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=458

Herbener, Jeffrey M. 2002. “After the Age of Inflation: Austrian Proposals for Monetary Reform,” The Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 5, No. 4, Winter: 5-19.

Hulsmann, Guido. 1998. “Liberale Währungsreform — ein Entwurf,” [An Outline of Currency Reform According to Market Principles]  eigentümlich frei, Nr. 4, pp. 110-115; http://www.mises.de/texte/huelsmann/Geldreform.html

Hülsmann, J. G. 2008. The Ethics of Money Production; Ludwig von Mises Institute, Auburn AL.

Kaza, Greg. 1996. “Is There a Case for the Gold Standard?”  The Intercollegiate Review. http://www.mmisi.org/ir/32_01/kaza.pdf

Laffer, Arthur, and Charles Kadlec. 1981. “The Point of Linking the Dollar to Gold.” Wall Street Journal, October 13.

Leconte, Pierre. 2003. La tragédie monétaire, 2nd ed., Paris: François-Xavier de Guibert

Mises, Ludwig. 1952. Epilogue to The Theory of Money and Credit , “The United States’ Return to a Sound Currency.”

Mises, Ludwig von. 1981. The Theory of Money and Credit, Indianapolis: LibertyPress/LibertyClassics, ch. 23.

Mundell, Robert. 1981. “Gold Would Serve into the 21st Century.” Wall Street Journal, September 30.

Murphy, Robert P. 2010. “Gold: The Market’s Global Currency.” November 11;

http://mises.org/daily/4841

North, Gary. 1986. Honest Money: Biblical Principles of Money and Banking, chaps 11-13

Paul, Ron.  1985. “The Political and Economic Agenda for a Real Gold Standard,” delivered at the Mises Institute’s 1985 conference on the gold standard; final chapter in The Gold Standard: Perspectives in the Austrian School: http://www.mises.org/books/goldstandard.pdf;

http://www.mises.org/story/2826

Rader, Randall R. 1980. “Remonetizing Gold, Again.” The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty. Vol. 30, No. 8, September; http://www.fee.org/publications/the-freeman/article.asp?aid=461

Reisman, George. 1996. Capitalism. Ottawa, Il.: Jameson Books, pp. 951-963

Reisman, George. 2000. “The Goal of Monetary Reform,” The quarterly journal of Austrian economics VOL. 3, NO. 3 (FALL): 3–18

Rothbard, Murray N. 1962. “The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar,” In Search of a Monetary Constitution, Leland B. Yeager, ed., Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 94-136, and Auburn, AL: Ludwig von Mises Institute, 1991. See also “The Logic of Action One” pp. 364-384; http://mises.org/story/1829http://mises.org/rothbard/100percent.pdf

Rothbard, Murray N. 1994. The Case Against the Fed.  Auburn, AL: The Ludwig von Mises Institute; http://mises.org/books/fed.pdf

Selgin, George. “Ten Things Every Economist Should Know about the Gold Standard.” June 4; http://www.alt-m.org/2015/06/04/ten-things-every-economist-should-know-about-the-gold-standard-2/

Sennholz, Hans, ed. 1975. The Luster of Gold. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, part IV

Sennholz, Hans. 1979. Age of Inflation, Western Islands; chap. VI

Sennholz, Hans. 1985. Money and Freedom, Spring Mills, Penn.: Libertarian Press, chap. 8

Siegel, Barry, ed. 1984. Money in Crisis: The Federal Reserve, The Economy, and Monetary Reform. San Francisco: Pacific Institute.  (See papers by Bordo, Weintraub, Reynold, Hayek and Robert Hall)

Vieira, Edwin. 2002. Pieces of Eight, 2nd ed., Fredericksburg, VA: Sheridan

Paul, Ron and Lehrman, Lewis. 1982.U.S. Gold Commission (September). The Case for Gold: A Minority Report of the U.S. Gold Commission. Washington, DC: Cato Institute (2d ed. Ludwig von Mises Institute, 2007). |

Block, Walter E. and William Barnett II. 2008. “Going (back) to gold money with no government gold: blood in the streets?” Indian Journal of Economics & Business, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 185-193; http://www.ijeb.com/Year2008_Dec.htm

Howden, David. 2008, ‘Stability of Gold Standard and its Selected Consequences: A Comment’, Procesos de Mercado: Revista Europea de Economía Política 5(1), 159-175.

Hans Sennholz, Hans. 1975. Gold is Money. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut

Melchior Palyi, The Twilight of Gold 1914-1936: Myths and Realities.

Block, Walter E. 1999. “The Gold Standard: A Critique of Friedman, Mundell, Hayek, Greenspan,” Managerial Finance, Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 15-33; http://giorgio.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContainer.do?containerType=Issue&containerId=13529http://www.mises.org/etexts/goldcritique.pdf

Best regards,

Walter

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3:10 am on May 3, 2020

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Should Illegal Immigrants Have Access to Government Subsidized Healthcare? Yes

Letter 1

From: Jonathan Gress

Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 5:17 PM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: isidewith

Hello Walter, how have you been? It was great seeing our email conversations published on LRC; I hope they helped other people working through the same issues. Thanks for sharing them with the world!

I’m just writing to get more of your thoughts on things. Have you ever taken the quiz on the website ISideWith? On most of the questions I was pretty sure what the libertarian answer was, but on some I wasn’t sure. E.g. I’m not entirely sure whether illegal immigrants should have access to government-subsidized healthcare. A lot of libertarians oppose this but I’m wondering if government should not bar access for the same reason it should not bar access to other public property. This ties in to our article on the ethics of public spending, I suppose.

Best wishes,

Jonathan

On November 20, 2019 at 7:32 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Letter 2

Dear Jonathan:

As long as the illegal immigrants are not members of the ruling class, I think it is more libertarian for them to have the money than for the government.

Block, Walter E. 2007. “Ron Paul and Matching Funds,” October 1;

https://archive.lewrockwell.com/block/block86.html

Best regards,

Walter

Walter E. Block, Ph.D.

Letter 3

From: Jonathan Gress

Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 9:56 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: RE: isidewith

Thanks for your response! Would you say it depended on the immigrant’s own ideological beliefs? If an illegal immigrant were a libertarian, it seems he would have a right to take the state’s wealth, but if he were a statist who supported wealth redistribution, it seems arguable that him taking advantage of taxpayer-funded services counts as being an accomplice in the theft. Having the government perform political tests on potential welfare recipients seems impractical, though.

I notice you oppose lending to the government. If I had some government bonds in my portfolio, would you say I had an obligation to divest myself of them?

Letter 4

From: Jonathan Gress

Sent: Saturday, December 7, 2019 11:46 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: RE: isidewith

What do you think of the idea that convicted felons should get voting rights restored? Do you think there is a single libertarian answer or is this a fundamentally practical question?

On November 21, 2019 at 1:00 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

In my view, this would not depend upon his ideological beliefs. Rather, it would depend upon presence or absence in the ruling class.

Walter E. Block, Ph.D.

Letter 5

From: Jonathan Gress

Sent: Saturday, December 7, 2019 9:02 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: RE: isidewith

So it sounds like you think we should not extend the franchise, even if the new voter might be a libertarian?

On December 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

I don’t think convicted felons should be allowed to vote in political elections.

I don’t think women should be allowed to vote in political elections.

I don’t think men should be allowed to vote in political elections..

We should ban all votes apart from those where people have in advance signed something indicating they are willing to be bound by the result of the vote. Stockholders should be allowed to vote. Condominium owners should be allowed to vote.

On the other hand, as long as we have political elections, I think only libertarians should be allowed to vote

I think the best book ever written on this, by far is, Hoppe, Hans. 2001. Democracy: The God that Failed

Letter 6

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Saturday, December 07, 2019 9:43 PM

To: Jonathan Gress <jonathan.gress@lpmaryland.org>

Subject: RE: isidewith

I favor extending it, but, only to libertarians

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4:50 pm on May 1, 2020

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letter 1

From: Gary Barnett
Sent: Sunday, February 09, 2020 12:34 PM
To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu
Subject: Rand Paul

Dear Walter,

You have stepped over the line of reason if you believe that Rand Paul is an “EXCELLENT” libertarian, unless the current meaning of libertarian means anyone leaning into the wind on a calm day. For if this were true, then most every other Republican, including Trump, would fall into this same category.

Even Rand Paul does not refer to himself as libertarian, which at least is more honest than any position to the contrary. It seems your “big tent” now has become open-ended almost without restriction.

As an aside, you also claim that Rand Paul is a “lousy libertarian,” but only as compared with Murray Rothbard. Comparison’s with that much reach could bring together polar opposites; very expressive of untenable compromise.

Sincerely and all my best … Gary

Letter 2

On Feb 9, 2020, at 6:25 PM, Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu wrote:

Dear Gary:

Ayn Rand didn’t call herself a libertarian, either. But she was an

excellent libertarian. With the possible exception of Ron Paul,

she converted more people to our banner than anyone else.

I don’t care what Rand Paul calls himself. In my big tent book, he’s

not only a libertarian, he’s an excellent one. WAY better than

Donald Trump.

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 3

—–Original Message—–

From: Gary Barnett

Sent: Monday, February 10, 2020 8:43 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Re: Rand Paul

Respectfully Walter, being a Republican, or any of the party

faithful, and doing one or two things that seem in the right

direction, does not a libertarian make. If it did, the term

libertarian would mean nothing.

Sincerely … Gary

Letter 4

On Feb 10, 2020, at 9:08 AM, Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu wrote:

Dear Gary:

One or two things? Compared to whom?

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 5

From: Gary Barnett

Sent: Monday, February 10, 2020 10:49 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Re: Rand Paul

Dear Walter,

All I am referring to is that Rand Paul is a Senator, and as I see

it, he has embraced the political system, and the processes that

allow it to continue to survive. Therefore, he votes or does not

vote, yes, no, or abstain, on issue after issue, bill after bill. If

one examines his voting record, it is relatively easy to discern

that he votes with the party trimmers often, but does not some of

the time. Given that he votes for some things that are more

favorable to the so-called libertarian position, big-tent

libertarians choose to embrace him for this partial favor. While it

is true that he may vote in a more “libertarian” manner at times,

certainly better than many, for what reason is this so? Is he doing

this out of a deep desire to be anti-state, anti-war, and pro-market

in the sense of all free markets for everyone? He is not. Or is he

walking the high wire by balancing his positions in order to please

his base? I believe he is gingerly staying in the middle?

I think it would be useful for those that claim to be libertarian to

define the term. If it means as I have been taught in the past that

libertarians are against government, against the state in general,

pro-market at every turn, and anti-war without compromise, then

those like Rand Paul and many others applauded by you, would never

qualify.

If your “big tent” philosophy wins the day, then continuous

compromise is necessary, and acceptance of bad positions is

required, simply due to support of these middle of the road politicians.

I am a peaceful anarchist or voluntarist if any label is necessary,

so It would be difficult for me to accept the current libertarian

position if compromise is the underlying premise of that position,

which seems to be the case. One can applaud a measure that helps the

libertarian cause without claiming that a part-time “libertarian”

supporting politician is an “excellent libertarian.”

My best … Gary

Letter 6.

On Feb 10, 2020, at 11:35 AM, Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu wrote:

Dear Gary:

I have no idea as to Rand’s motives. I have not made a study of each

and every one of his votes. I have no doubt that on the libertarian

criterion, he’d be more libertarian, way more, than any other senator.

What’s libertarianism? In my view, it comprises a 5 level hierarchy,

in this

order:

1.Anarcho-capitalism. No government at all. Major spokesmen: Murray

Rothbard, Hans Hoppe 2.Minarchism. Limited govt libertarianism. The

govt has one role: to protect people living in the US. To this end,

only 3 institutions are justified:

armies, police, courts. Major spokesmen: Ayn Rand, Robert Nozick.

3.Constitutionalism. Our constitution is the principle. But, as

interpreted by people like Ron Paul and Andrew Napolitano, major

spokesmen. Why worse than the above? This document supports roads and

post offices.

4.Classical liberalism. Major spokesmen: Milton Friedman and

Friedrich Hayek. Very free market, but all sorts of exceptions;

welfare, public goods, etc. Very good on free trade, min wage, rent

control.

5.Thick libertarianism. Major spokesmen: people who write for

Bleeding Heart Libertarians, Reason, Cato, too many leaders of the

Libertarian Party, etc.

They are spread out amongst the top 4, including an caps, but they

add irrelevancies to libertarianism, about which our philosophy has

no views whatsoever. Homosexuality, mixed marriages, opposition to

hierarchy, etc.

I consider all of the above to be libertarians, so, yes, I’m a big

tent person. Rand Paul fits into #3. I’m in #1.

Here is my estimate as to the proportion of people who fall into

these five categories. This adds up to more that 100%, given the

overlap between #5 and these others

1. 2%

2. 20%

3. 20%

4. 58% = 100%

5. 25%

Best regards

Walter

Letter 7

From: Gary Barnett

Sent: Monday, February 10, 2020 1:29 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Re: Rand Paul

Walter,

I do not know where you came up with these numbers, but most all in

this country are collectivists, which only leads to a total decline of

society.

And if your example includes all these criteria, then what is

libertarianism but an all-inclusive and collectivist herd. How can

this ideology be set apart with no clear positions to solidify

thought? In other words, most anybody and everybody could be called

libertarian on any given day. This is my break with your thinking,

because with parameters of this magnitude, there is no defined

position that is based on real freedom due to natural rights only. I

never had any use for consensus.

As to the Constitution, it is not principled in any way as far as I am

concerned, and I have written much about that central planning coup.

And Walter, if you are in number 1, do you not accept that this is

contradictory?

Best … Gary

Letter 8

On Feb 10, 2020, at 1:38 PM, Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu wrote:

Dear Gary:

I see nothing wrong with collectivism, provided that it is voluntary.

These are all examples, and, all are fully compatible with liberty:

nunnery, convent, kibbutz, commune, collective, syndicalist,

cooperatives, monastery, abbey, priory, friary, religious community,

family

I think your understanding of libertarianism is far too narrow. It

includes, only, an caps.

Those numbers are guesstimates of mine.

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 9

From: Gary Barnett

Sent: Monday, February 10, 2020 3:22 PM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Re: Rand Paul

Walter,

I was speaking of societal collectivism, not nunneries, as occurs today in the party system, in the divisive groups, as in the herd, which is the death knell of intellectual thought, and therefore the ruination of societies.

Voluntary participation in groups of individuals is a far cry from equality-seeking collectivist mobs as exist in America.

Sincerely … Gary

Letter 10

Dear Gary:

I guess we’ll have to agree to disagree on this. I think collectivism is compatible with libertarianism. I’m not a thick libertarian. Obviously, I oppose ” equality-seeking collectivist mobs as exist in America.” But I would also oppose, again on libertarian grounds, inequality-seeking individualist mobs as do not exist in America.

Some lefties are very individualistic. They  pride themselves on being different, even than their “progressive” cohorts. But they are still evil.

Not because of collectivism-individualism, but due to the fact that they violate the NAP.

There are murderers who are individualistic. Maybe they are hermits or semi-hermits. But, since they violate the NAP, they are bad guys, even though not collectivists.

Best regards,

Walter

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4:49 pm on May 1, 2020

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Is A Rapist Guilty of Murder if His Victim Dies in Childbirth?

Letter 1

From: José Roberto Hall Brum de Barros

Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 2:10 AM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Re: murder and rape

Hi Dr. Block,

I read your recent post about the culpability of the rapist in case the woman dies during childbirth. You said he would be guilty of murder. Wouldn’t it be more correct to say that he would, at best, be guilty of manslaughter? After all, it’s not possible to claim, from the rape itself and all other things being equal, that the rapist intended to kill the woman (from what I understand, to be guilty of murder you have to either intend the death or, at the very least, to think that death is a probable result of your action and not care about it- this might just be a difference in legal systems though).

Best Regards,

Jose.

Letter 2

May I have your permission to blog this conversation, after I answer it substantively?

Walter

From: José Roberto Hall Brum de Barros

Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 2:46 AM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Assunto: RE: murder and rape

Sure, I am honored every time you take your time to clarify these issues for me.

Letter 3

Dear Jose:

You falsely attribute this to me: “You said he would be guilty of murder.” But,  denied this. Yes, I agree, manslaughter would be more accurate than murder, but I don’t think he is even guilty of that crime. He is only a rapist, which is very evil in and of itself.

Suppose A rapes B. Assume the contrary conditional, that had A not raped B, the latter would have been hit by the proverbial bus, and killed. So, in a sense, A did B a favor by raping her, in that, let us posit not unreasonably, she would have preferred to be raped by the evil A, rather than killed by the bus.

So, is A no longer a criminal, since he did B a favor? No. Of course this is not true. A is still a rapist and should be punished for this evil deed, even though it had good effects (this brutalization saved B’s life). A should not be given any credit for this.

Similarly, suppose the opposite. Due to the rape, B somehow IS hit by the bus. Is A not merely a rapist but also a murderer. No. In my view, he is still (only an evil) rapist, but still not a murderer.

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 4

From: José Roberto Hall Brum de Barros

Sent: Sunday, February 02, 2020 2:06 AM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Subject: Assunto: RE: Assunto: RE: murder and rape

Dear Dr. Block, I meant in the second hypothetical, if the woman would die during childbirth. This is what you wrote in that case:

“Now, if the mother were to die in childbirth, I think that would be a different matter. Here, her death is traceable to the rape. I would hold the rapist guilty of murder in this case, but not the other”

It’s that particular case (A rapes B, B dies during childbirth, A would be guilty of murdering B) that I was referencing in my question to you.

I agree that the rapist cannot be guilty of any crime against the baby.

Regards,

Jose.

Letter 5

Dear Jose:

Thanks for clarifying your point. I agree with you: if the woman dies in childbirth, the rapist is guilty not of first degree murder, but, rather, of manslaughter. I still think he should face the death penalty, since, due to his evil act, the rape, the woman died.

Rapist A’s victim dies in childbirth, while rapist B’s victim does not die in childbirth. B gets off with a lesser criminal charge than A, rape, rather than murder. But, isn’t this “unfair” to A? They are both guilty of the same crime, after all, and yet receive very different punishments. I think this is justified based on the doctrine, “you take your victim as you find him.” A punches C in the nose, B punches D in the nose. C dies; he’s in a weakened condition. D is only slightly harmed. Is it unfair to consider C a murdered, while holding B guilty of only assault and battery? Well, maybe, yes, who knows. But the bottom line is that these very different punishments are justified. If you’re worried about this, don’t rape anyone, or punch anyone in the nose.

I agree, rapist A is “only” guilty of rape, not murder. But, during the course of a lesser crime, if a victim dies by “accident” I think the murderer owes his life to the heirs of the victim.

On libertarian punishment theory, see this:

In the view of Rothbard (1998, p. 88, ft. 6): “It should be evident that our theory of proportional punishment—that people may be punished by losing their rights to the extent that they have invaded the rights of others—is frankly a retributive theory of punishment, a ‘tooth (or two teeth) for a tooth’ theory. Retribution is in bad repute among philosophers, who generally dismiss the concept quickly as ‘primitive’ or ‘barbaric’ and then race on to a discussion of the two other major theories of punishment: deterrence and rehabilitation. But simply to dismiss a concept as ‘barbaric’ can hardly suffice; after all, it is possible that in this case, the ‘barbarians’ hit on a concept that was superior to the more modern creeds.” For more in this vein see Block, 1999, 2002-2003, 2003A, 2003B, 2004A, 2004B, 2006, 2009A, 2009B; Block, Barnett and Callahan, 2005; Gregory and Block, 2007; Kinsella, 1996; Marjanovic, 2013; Morris, 1968; Nozick, 1981, pp. 363-373; Olson, 1979; Rothbard, 1998, 88; Rothschild and Block, 2016; Whitehead and Block, 2003

Block, Walter E. 1999. “Market Inalienability Once Again: Reply to Radin,” Thomas Jefferson Law Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1, Fall, pp. 37-88; http://www.walterblock.com/publications/market_inalienability.pdf;

Block, Walter E. 2002-2003. “Berman on Blackmail: Taking Motives Fervently,” Florida State University Business Review, Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 57-114

Block, Walter E. 2003a. “Libertarianism vs. Objectivism; A Response to Peter Schwartz,” Reason Papers, Vol. 26, Summer, pp. 39-62

Block, Walter E. 2003b. “The Non Aggression Axiom of Libertarianism,” February 17; https://archive.lewrockwell.com/block/block26.html

(15th floor flagpole)

Block, Walter E. 2004a. Austrian Law and Economics: The Contributions of Adolf Reinach and Murray Rothbard, Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 7, No. 4, Winter, pp. 69-85

Block, Walter E. 2004b. “Reply to Frank van Dun’s ‘Natural Law and the Jurisprudence of Freedom,’” Journal of Libertarian Studies. Vol. 18, No. 2, Spring, pp. 65-72.

Block, Walter E. 2006. “Radical Libertarianism: Applying Libertarian Principles to Dealing with the Unjust Government, Part II” Reason Papers, Vol. 28, Spring, pp.  85-109; http://www.walterblock.com/publications/block_radical-libertarianism-rp.pdf;

Block, Walter E. 2009A. “Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism” in Hulsmann, Jorg Guido and Stephan Kinsella, eds., Property, Freedom and Society: Essays in Honor of Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Auburn, AL: Ludwig von Mises Institute, pp. 137-148; http://mises.org/books/hulsmann-kinsella_property-freedom-society-2009.pdf

Block, Walter E. 2009B. “Libertarian punishment theory: working for, and donating to, the state” Libertarian Papers, Vol. 1; http://libertarianpapers.org/2009/17-libertarian-punishment-theory-working-for-and-donating-to-the-state/

Block, Walter E., William Barnett II and Gene Callahan. 2005. “The Paradox of Coase as a Defender of Free Markets,” NYU Journal of Law & Liberty, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 1075-1095; http://tinyurl.com/2hbzd4

Gregory, Anthony and Walter E. Block. 2007. “On Immigration: Reply to Hoppe.” Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol. 21, No. 3, Fall, pp. 25-42; http://mises.org/journals/jls/21_3/21_3_2.pdf

Kinsella, Stephen. 1996. “Punishment and Proportionality: the Estoppel Approach,” The Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1, Spring, pp. 51-74; http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/12_1/12_1_3.pdf

Marjanovic, Marko. 2013. “Least, Sufficient Force: Libertarian Theory of Defense/” January 7; https://voluntaryistreader.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/least-sufficient-force-libertarian-theory-of-defense/

Morris, Herbert. 1968. “Persons and Punishment.” The Monist. Volume 52, Issue 4: October, pp. 475 – 501; http://www.law-lib.utoronto.ca/bclc/crimweb/bboard/personsandpunishment.pdf

Nozick, Robert. 1981. Philosophical Explanations, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

Olson, Charles B. 1979. “Law in Anarchy.” Libertarian Forum. Vol. XII, No. 6, November-December, p. 4; http://64.233.167.104/u/Mises?q=cache:gFT18_ZusWoJ:www.mises.org/journals/lf/1979/1979_11-12.pdf+two+teeth+for+a+tooth&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

Rothbard, Murray N. 1998. The Ethics of Liberty, New York: New York University Press. http://www.mises.org/rothbard/ethics/ethics.asp;

Rothschild, Daniel Y. and Walter E. Block. 2016. “It Is Not Armed Robbery When Government Takes People’s Stuff, It Is Civil Asset Forfeiture.” Journal of Social and Administrative Sciences www.kspjournals.org. September, Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 219-230;

http://www.kspjournals.org/index.php/JSAS/article/view/912http://www.kspjournals.org/index.php/JSAS/article/view/912/1029

http://www.kspjournals.org/index.php/JSAS/author/submission/912

Whitehead, Roy and Walter E. Block. 2003. “Taking the assets of the criminal to compensate victims of violence: a legal and philosophical approach,” Wayne State University Law School Journal of Law in Society Vol. 5, No. 1, Fall, pp.229-254

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4:48 pm on April 30, 2020

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Can New Discoveries of Raw Materials Destroy Markets? No.

From: David German [mailto:davidgerman092088@att.net]

Sent: Tuesday, December 31, 2019 1:25 PM

To: wblock@loyno.edu

Cc: Clifton Knox

Subject: Asteroid mining

This is a short video, if you could watch and examine this, what would be your response to Keith Woods?

https://youtu.be/f93vNxbQAGU

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2020 1:04 AM

To: ‘David German’ <davidgerman092088@att.net>

Cc: ‘Clifton Knox’ <cliftonwknox@gmail.com>

Subject: RE: Asteroid mining

This video makes the point that raw material discoveries can destroy markets. Nonsense.

No. Discoveries just lower the price compared to what it what otherwise be. Only governments can destroy markets, not discoveries of new supplies. This is basic economics 101. New shale techniques for oil lowered its price. No destruction here. Just cheaper gas for everyone.

Walter E. Block,

From: David German [mailto:davidgerman092088@att.net]

Sent: Tuesday, December 31, 2019 9:28 PM

To: Walter Block

Cc: ‘Clifton Knox’

Subject: Re: Asteroid mining

Do you think like a Bezos type situation where raw materials flooding the market will destroy the market?

On Tuesday, December 31, 2019, 5:06:55 PM CST, Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu> wrote:

Dear David:

I loved the pictures and, his accent. Both lovely.

As for the other aspects of it, I wish he would take my courses at Loyola, and/or, read this book, in which I discuss asteroid mining.

Nelson, Peter Lothian and Walter E. Block. 2018. Space capitalism: the case for privatizing space travel and colonization. Palgrave Macmillan; https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-74651-7https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/3319746502/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&condition=new&qid=1531187909&sr=8-1&linkCode=sl2&tag=economicpolicyjournal-20&linkId=959e913e476f48b289a16223d557a826http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2018/07/new-walter-block-book-space-capitalism.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+economicpolicyjournal%2FKpwH+%28EconomicPolicyJournal.com%29https://filling-space.com/2019/01/18/space-capitalism-laissez-faire-in-the-heavens/

You can access my appearance here:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?448910-4/space-capitalism;

https://mises.org/power-market/walter-block-talks-space-capitalism-cspan;

https://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/hey-im-on-tv-c-span/

Maybe, just listen to my cspan interview on it?

To answer your question, no one who mentions libertarianism is all bad, even if he does so fallaciously. This guy mentions libertarianism. So I support that aspect of his presentation.

Best regards,

Walter

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2:34 pm on April 30, 2020

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Here is part I

Here is part II:

From: Bryan Riley <briley@ntu.org>

Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2020 11:20 AM

To: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: Re: Economists letter on trade policy

I understand–thanks for taking the time to email. As you may recall I found your classic book “Defending the Undefendable” on the racks of the Kansas St University library back in the 1980s and it has had a lasting impact. For what it’s worth I didn’t write the line you are concerned about but we didn’t think it was a deal breaker in general!

Dear Bryan:

Thanks for your kind words. The one line was a deal breaker for me since it called upon the government to do something. It implied that the free enterprise system would not suffice. Eg., that there was a market failure. I’m not a big fan of the market failure doctrine.

Here’s a bibliography of Austro-libertarian critiques of this attack on laissez faire capitalism:

Pro:

Bator, 1958; Hummel, 2008; Medema, 2004; Pigou, 1932

Bator, Francis M.  1958.  The anatomy of market failure.  Quarterly Journal of Economics 72 (August):  351–79.

Hummel, Jeffrey Rogers. 2008. “Toward a Libertarian Reconstruction of Neoclassical Welfare Theory” Journal of Private Enterprise 24.1: 119-130;

http://works.bepress.com/jeffrey_hummel/15

Medema, Steven G. July 2004. “Mill, Sidgwick, and the Evolution of the Theory of Market Failure,” July; http://www.utilitarian.net/sidgwick/about/2004070102.pdf

Pigou, Arthur, C. 1932 [1920]. The Economics of Welfare, 4th ed. London: Macmillan

Con:

Anderson, 1998; Barnett, et. al, 2005; Block, 2001, 2002; Callahan, 2000; Cowen, 1988; DiLorenzo, 2011; Guillory, 2005; Higgs, 1995; Hoppe, 2003; MacKenzie, 2002; McCloskey, 2018; Rothbard, 1985;  Simpson, 2005; Tucker, 1989; Westley, 2002; Woods, 2009A, 2009B

Anderson, William L. 1998. “Market Failure?” October 8; http://www.mises.org/story/53

Barnett II, William, Walter E. Block and Michael Saliba. 2005. “Perfect Competition: A Case of ‘Market-Failure,’” Corporate Ownership & Control. Vol. 2, No. 4, summer, p. 70-75

Block, Walter E. 2001. “Comment on Canice Prendergast’s ‘A Theory of ‘Yesmen,’” Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 4, No. 2, summer, pp. 61-68; http://www.mises.org/journals/qjae/pdf/qjae4_2_5.pdf

Block, Walter E. 2002. “All Government is Excessive: A Rejoinder to ‘In Defense of Excessive Government’ by Dwight Lee,” Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 35-82; http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/16_3/16_3_3.pdf

Callahan, Gene. 2000. “Market Failure Again?” April 4; http://www.mises.org/story/407

Cowen, Tyler, ed. 1988. The Theory of Market Failure: A Critical Examination, Fairfax, VA: George Mason University Press

DiLorenzo, Thomas. 2011. “A Note on the Canard of ‘Asymmetric Information’ as a Source of Market Failure.” Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, Vol. 14,  No. 2, 249–255, Summer

http://mises.org/journals/qjae/pdf/qjae14_2_6.pdf

Guillory, Gil. 2005. “What Are You Calling Failure?” May 5; http://www.mises.org/story/1806

Higgs, Robert. 1995. “The Myth of ‘Failed’ Policies.” The Free Market. June. Vol. 13, No. 6. http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.asp?control=239&sortorder=articledate

Hoppe, Hans-Hermann, ed. 2003. The Myth of National Defense: Essays on the Theory and History of Security Production. Auburn, AL: The Ludwig von Mises Institute

MacKenzie, D. W. 2002. “The Market Failure Myth “August 26;

http://www.mises.org/fullstory.aspx?control=1035

McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen. 2018. “They Hate the Chicago School and Have Never Heard of the Austrian School.” February 11; http://reason.com/archives/2018/02/11/the-applied-theory-of-bossing

Rothbard, Murray N. 1985. “Airport Congestion: A Case of Market Failure?” The Free Market.  Auburn, AL: The Ludwig von Mises Institute, January, http://www.mises.org/econsense/ch52.asp

Simpson, Brian. 2005. Markets Don’t Fail. New York, N.Y.: Lexington Books

Westley, Christopher. 2002. “The Myth of Market Failure” June 14; http://www.mises.org/story/982

Woods, Thomas E. Jr. 2009A. “Krugman Failure, Not Market Failure” June 19; https://www.lewrockwell.com/woods/woods116.html

Woods, Thomas E. Jr. 2009B. “Response to the ‘Market Failure’ Drones” June 10; http://mises.org/story/3503

Best regards,

Walter

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2:33 pm on April 30, 2020

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RE: Economists letter on trade policy

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>
Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2020 11:09 AM
To: ‘Bryan Riley, National Taxpayers Union’ <briley@ntu.org>
Subject: RE: Economists letter on trade policy

Dear Bryan:

I’d gladly sign this, except for this one line:

Smart policies such as federal government stockpiling look more promising.

I’m sorely tempted to sign it anyway, since the rest of this letter is really excellent.  But, I’d better stick to my policy of signing on to letters with which I agree fully.

Sorry, but please keep me on your list. This is a great initiative of the NTU.

Best regards,

Walter

From: Bryan Riley, National Taxpayers Union <briley@ntu.org>
Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2020 10:52 AM
To: wblock@loyno.edu
Subject: Economists letter on trade policy

Economists letter on trade policy.

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2:17 pm on April 30, 2020

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Letter 1

From: johnf
Sent: Thursday, December 19, 2019 11:07 AM
To: wblock@loyno.edu
Subject: American Slavery Reparations

Hello Dr. Block,  I read with great interest your article “Return of Stolen Property: A Libertarian Case for Reparations”.  I was truly surprised at the conjunction of Libertarian philosophy and the topic of reparations.  My BonaFides are voting Libertarian for the last 30 years, read most of Sowell’s work, and have been an avid reader of Dr. Williams for at least 15 years.  I even wrote in his name for President the year I could not vote for the “libertarian” ex-congressman from California.   I even sent an email to Dr. Williams telling him of my vote so that I could brag to all of my Progressive friends that I had voted for a black man.  They just assumed it was Obama.

As a Libertarian, I very much agree with your premise having to do with property rights.  However important property rights are in our society, they are not widely appreciated and simply taken for granted.  My “lightning bolt on the road to Damascus” came this year as I was trying to understand the deep cultural differences in our society and the threat they pose to our future freedoms. For me, the one single idea that does make us a shining city on the hill is the concept of “equal opportunity” for all citizens.  For me, the vision of a 7-year-old black child in any inner-city all over the country is simply NOT going to have an equal opportunity.  In fact, as Walter Williams often points out, educational opportunities for black children have become much worse since even his time.   And, I believe this is a primary cause of the cultural divide that will not lessen until we can offer better educational learning opportunities.  That is where I hope a national discussion on reparations can be effective and gain support from a much wider proportion of society.  As a teacher, I am guessing you will understand my thought on this matter.

I am writing and seeking your interest and help regarding slavery reparations in America.  We are forming a nonprofit organization that will create an opportunity for all people of goodwill to finally have a long-needed national public conversation about reparations.  We want to challenge our society’s assumptions, beliefs, and expectations about reparations.  More information can be seen at www.slavereparations.org

We want to help heal the scars of racial bondage and repair the legacy of slavery in the United States.  We strongly feel the US needs to address its past history of slavery.   Reparations are an important issue needing honest compassionate engagement by all people in our society.   We understand reparations cannot change the past but they can certainly affect the present.  There remain today many examples of cultural and economic racial divisions in America. People of honest intent recognize wide disparities still exist today in economics, criminal justice, and educational opportunities.

There are many current actions that would go a long way toward overcoming America’s legacy and would benefit African-Americans in substantial ways.  Those actions include, but not limited to, criminal-justice reform, job training, college scholarships, and inner-city K-12 education reforms.  We believe these reforms for poorer African-Americans could be transformative steps toward the equal opportunity promised by our founders.  Reparations could be a recognition we can do better as a society of believers in equal opportunities for all.

Every long journey starts with a single step.  We desire to move beyond questions of past slave-holders and slavery victims.  They no longer exist, but we know there is a current insistent and obvious need for reconciliation actions.  America needs to have a responsible public conversation about reparations.  I am asking for your thoughts, suggestions, and help.

Please share our efforts with others who may have an interest.

More information is on the links below.

My contact information is also included.

Best Regards,

John Flanagan

American Slave Reparations

www.slavereparations.org

www.gofundme.com/f/6y97qh-american-slavery-reparations

Letter 2

From: Walter Block [mailto:wblock@loyno.edu]

Sent: Thursday, December 19, 2019 12:43 PM

To: johnf

Subject: RE: American Slavery Reparations

Dear John:

Thanks for your kind words.

Hopefully, you’ll excuse me for very slightly disagreeing with you on a few points.

I don’t think there’s any need to  “heal the scars of racial bondage and repair the legacy of slavery in the United States.” My reason for saying this? The publications of Sowell and Williams and Charles Murray too. In their view, which I think is correct, the present plight of the black community has nothing to do with any vestige of slavery in the US.

The reason I support reparations has nothing to do with any of that. It stems from my concern for libertarianism, private property rights, return of stolen property, etc. Here are my pubs on this topic:

Alston and Block, 2007; Block, 1993, 2001, 2002; Block and Yeatts, 1999-2000; Crepelle and Block, 2017

Alston, Wilton D. and Walter E. Block. 2007. “Reparations, Once Again.” Human Rights Review, Vol. 9, No. 3, September, pp. 379-392; http://tinyurl.com/2b75fl

Block, Walter E. 1993. “Malcolm X,” Fraser Forum, January, pp. 18-19; http://mises.org/Community/forums/t/5361.aspx

Block, Walter E. 2001. “The Moral Dimensions of Poverty, Entitlements and Theft,” The Journal of Markets and Morality, Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 83-93; http://www.acton.org/publicat/m_and_m/2001_spring/block.htmlhttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=922087http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCcQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marketsandmorality.com%2Findex.php%2Fmandm%2Farticle%2Fdownload%2F587%2F577&ei=lBn9UuLIOtDOkQe1toHwBw&usg=AFQjCNF2MZ5XoFKKMF5UcOfOT5Kv-HQgZA&sig2=VVYWZhyl0ZmAWRAKXtkxWw; Search for “Walter Block” under “Authors” here: http://www.marketsandmorality.com/index.php/mandm/search

Block, Walter E. 2002. “On Reparations to Blacks for Slavery,” Human Rights Review, Vol. 3, No. 4, July-September, pp. 53-73;

http://www.walterblock.com/wp-content/uploads/publications/reparations_slavery.pdfhttps://link.springer.com/journal/12142/3/4/page/1https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12142-002-1003-4

(David Horowitz, Randall Robinson)

Block, Walter E. and Guillermo Yeatts. 1999-2000. “The Economics and Ethics of Land Reform: A Critique of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace’s ‘Toward a Better Distribution of Land: The Challenge of Agrarian Reform,’” Journal of Natural Resources and Environmental Law, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 37-69; http://www.walterblock.com/publications/ethics_land_reform.pdf

Crepelle, Adam and Walter E. Block. 2017. “Property Rights and Freedom:  The Keys to Improving Life in Indian Country.” Washington & Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice; Vol. 23, Issue 2, Article, 3, pp. 314-342; http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1435&context=crsjhttp://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/crsj/vol23/iss2/3

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 3

From: johnf

Sent: Thursday, December 19, 2019 1:46 PM

To: ‘Walter Block’

Subject: RE: American Slavery Reparations

Walter,  thank you for your reply and reading sources.  I will read them with interest.

From the titles, I now understand your focus on property rights.  My only problem with this focus is the same problems that occur when the focus is on cash transfers.  The same questions and mental roadblocks occur as I am sure you are aware.  I have developed a unique way of framing discussions with people regarding reparations.  Most people, are very negative about cash transfers.  I try to reframe the discussion by first asking them what they understand about reparations.  Almost all people will say initially they are against transferring money to anyone and for many legitimate reasons.  I then ask them if they believe there might be some fundamental differences in our cultures that could be lessened with better access to education or earning opportunities.  Most people of goodwill agree and I now have an opportunity to discuss reparations with an open mind.

As you say, there is a clear and “present plight in the black community”.   I am seeking a way to lessen and minimize the cultural divide in our communities.  Cultural warfare, whether real or political, is a real danger to diminish or destroy property rights.  We are not in disagreement, just trying to accomplish the same goal using different tools.   I want as many people on the “change bus” as possible.  This requires “buy-in” from many belief structures.  Just as with Libertarians, there are many flavors of belief.

My very best regards to you.  Thank you again for all of your efforts.

John

Letter 4

From: Walter Block <wblock@loyno.edu>

Sent: Thursday, December 19, 2019 4:05 PM

To: johnf

Subject: RE: American Slavery Reparations

Dear John:

We agree that there is a “present plight in the black community.” My solution for it is to get rid of the governmental causes of it: welfare, minimum wage, drug laws, food stamps, affirmative action, etc.

I think very few black people will be able to prove family connection to particular plantations. If they can, they should receive part of the lands from the present, not cash transfers (unless agreed upon).

Best regards,

Walter

Letter 5

From: johnf

Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 4:46 PM

To: ‘Walter Block’ <wblock@loyno.edu>

Subject: RE: American Slavery Reparations

Hello Walter,  Yes, you may use my name and use anything I have said in previous correspondence in your blog.

From your responses, I can tell you we are “brothers from different mothers”.   I am a 35-year Libertarian voter who has always pushed for a government small enough that it can be drowned in the bathtub if necessary.  Changing cultural expectations about personal responsibility is the only long term solution for all citizens regardless of ethnic background.

My efforts regarding reparations have only to do with a recognition that the society I live in right now as presently constituted does not offer the same opportunity to a 7-year-old living in an inner-city and starting out in school.  We probably agree on that problem, and as to what the major reasons are for that lack of opportunity.  My goal was simply to open up a discussion that is the single most important failure in our society.  Allowing educational opportunities for all citizens equally.

I am quite aware of the deep divisions within the black community about family connections and origins.  They are only divisions in the black community because Reparations are not a serious thought in the wider communities.  My goal is to reframe the discussion and find some common ground that can allow necessary changes in the larger common society.

We are on the same bus Walter.  Good luck in your efforts at “Candle Lighting”.  Please send a note when you publish your blog.

John

Poverty and pride are devoted blood brothers until one always and inevitably kills the other.

John Flanagan

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5:13 pm on April 29, 2020

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